Human Resources Management

  • Program Title: Human Resources Management
    Credential: Diploma
    Delivery: Online
    Program Length:3 Semesters (52 Weeks)
    Program Availability: Full time or Part time
    Offered: This program is available starting every Monday.

    Description


    This comprehensive Human Resources Management diploma program covers all the key functions in this diverse field, including employment law, labour relations, training and development, pension and benefit plans, occupational health and safety, compensation, recruitment and selection. The expertise, knowledge and management skills you acquire here can be applied to any organization. This program prepares you to work in all areas of human resources. Core concepts are studied in an online setting. In three semesters you will gain the knowledge, skills and experience to become a highly marketable human resources manager.

    Students have three (3) semesters to complete their program requirements, starting from the date of their first course.

     

    Learning Outcomes


    The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to:

    1. Contribute to the development, implementation, and evaluation of employee recruitment, selection, and retention plans and processes.
    2. Administer and contribute to the design and evaluation of the performance management program.
    3. Develop, implement, and evaluate employee orientation, training, and development programs.
    4. Facilitate and support effective employee and labour relations in both non-union and union environments.
    5. Research and support the development and communication of the organization’s total compensation plan.
    6. Collaborate with others, in the development, implementation, and evaluation of organizational health and safety policies and practices.
    7. Research and analyze information needs and apply current and emerging information technologies to support the human resources function.
    8. Develop, implement, and evaluate organizational development strategies aimed at promoting organizational effectiveness.
    9. Present and evaluate communication messages and processes related to the human resources function of the organization.
    10. Manage own professional development and provide leadership to others in the achievement of ongoing competence in human resources professional practice.
    11. Facilitate and communicate the human resources component of the organization’s business plan.
    12. Conduct research produce reports and recommend changes in human resources practices.

    Your Career


    The Human Resource Manager is responsible for providing support in the various human resource functions, which include recruitment, staffing, training and development, performance monitoring and employee counseling. The Human Resource Manager provides advice and assistance to supervisors and staff. This may include information on training needs and opportunities, job descriptions, performance reviews and personnel policies of the Council. The position coordinates the staff recruitment process. The Human Resource Manager provides advice and support to supervisors and staff selection committees and ensures that they have accurate and timely information in order to make effective decisions. Failure to provide adequate advice or assistance may result in lost opportunities for staff development, poor staff morale, financial loss to staffs for residents and a loss of credibility for the Chief and Council.

     

  • Admission Requirements


    College Eligibility

    • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent; OR
    • Online Wonderlic Mature Student Test
    • General Educational Development (GED); OR
    • Mature Student status (19 years of age or older and without a high school diploma at the start of the program).

    Application Process
    Program intake – Apply to this program by visiting our Registration page. If you are entering into this program as a mature student please attach your resume when submitting your registration information online.

    Academic prerequisites for this program may be obtained free of charge through Academic Upgrading.

  • Courses


    Semester 1
    Indigenous Canada
    Communication Strategies
    Writing Reports and Proposals
    Orientation Handbook: Getting Employees Off to a Good Start
    Workplace Ergonomics
    Conflict and Dispute Resolution
    Interpersonal Skills
    Human Resource Management

    Semester 2
    The World of Human Resources Management
    Strategy and Human Resources Planning
    Equity and Diversity in Human Resources Management
    Job Analysis, Employee Involvement, and Flexible Work Schedules
    Recruitment and Careers
    Employee Selection
    Training and Development
    Appraising and Improving Performance

    Semester 3
    Managing Compensation
    Pay-for-Performance: Incentive Rewards
    Employee Benefits
    Safety and Health
    Employee Rights and Discipline
    The Dynamics of Labour Relations
    International Human Resources Management
    Creating High-Performance Work Systems

    Every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy of information provided on our website. The College reserves the right to modify any course, program, curriculum, fee, timetable, or campus location at any time.

  • Course Descriptions


    Semester 1
    Indigenous Canada
    Indigenous Canada is a 12-lesson Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) that explores Indigenous histories and contemporary issues in Canada. From an Indigenous perspective, this course explores key issues facing Indigenous peoples today from a historical and critical perspective highlighting national and local Indigenous-settler relations. Topics for the 12 lessons include the fur trade and other exchange relationships, land claims and environmental impacts, legal systems and rights, political conflicts and alliances, Indigenous political activism, and contemporary Indigenous life, art and its expressions.

    Communication Strategies
    The primary aim of this course is to enable students with an understanding of the impact that their communication skills can have on others, while exploring the different ways in which developing these skills can make it easier for them to succeed in the work force.

    Orientation Handbook: Getting Employees Off to a Good Start
    Students will learn how important the orientation program is to an organization in terms of engagement, retention, and fiscal responsibility; to identify the role of the human resources department in orientation, explore the commitment curve, determine critical elements of effective employee training, help employees settle into their new environment and establish relationships, and to consider the value of an employee handbook (hard copy or online) for new and existing employees.

    Workplace Ergonomics: Injury Prevention Through Ergonomics
    An Employer that is committed to their employees’ health and safety understands the value of an effective workplace ergonomics program, which can maintain and even increase productivity. Workplace Ergonomics: Injury Prevention Through Ergonomics is poised to teach about the susceptibility of the human body when exposed to repetitive strain. Students will learn the basic principles of ergonomics, how to design an ergonomic workstation, outlines ergonomic practices for common postures and movements, and how to identify ergonomic hazards and minimize their effects.

    Conflict and Dispute Resolution
    In this course students will learn how to recognize how their own attitudes and actions impact others, effective techniques for dealing with difficult people, strategies for dealing with anger, and how to cope with the difficult people and situations that we will inevitably encounter in our everyday lives.

    Interpersonal Skills
    This course focuses on the development of self-awareness, increased understanding of others and development of effective interpersonal communication skills that can be used in a variety of care-giving contexts. Students will be encouraged to become more aware of the impact of their own communication choices and patterns.

    Human Resources Management
    Students will be introduced to the basics of human resources management, including orientation, compensation, and benefits. This course provides an understanding of job analysis, how to plan training and legally defensible terminations.

    Semester 2
    The World of Human Resources Management
    The purpose of this lesson is to acquaint students with the importance of human resources management (HRM) and how it contributes to the achievement of an organization’s overall objectives. In this lesson we discuss how people can be a source of competitive advantage, the competitive challenges facing firms, and the concerns of employees themselves. Students are made aware of some of the important efforts that both large and small companies are making to develop and utilize the talents of their people as well as the changes taking place in the work environment. We end the lesson with a discussion of the competencies HR managers and line managers need to possess in order to work together to make the most of employees’ talents.

    Strategy and Human Resources Planning
    This lesson emphasizes the need for effective human resources planning (HRP) as a means of ensuring that qualified employees will be available to meet staffing needs when and where they occur. Two principal approaches to HRP and to the requirements for accomplishing such planning effectively are introduced. Some of the more important factors that may determine an organization’s HR needs, as well as the sources from which the different classes of employees may be obtained, are discussed.

    Equity and Diversity in Human Resources Management
    The purpose of this lesson is to discuss the employment equity legislation and organizational response to this legislation. The lesson emphasizes compliance with employment equity as a management of the diversity of human capital within organizations.

    Job Analysis, Employee Involvement, and Flexible Work Schedules
    One major goal of this lesson is to teach the students the importance of job design and job descriptions in providing a foundation for an effective HR program. This lesson emphasizes the necessity for basing decisions involving the various HR functions on the requirements of the job. Accurate job descriptions can lead to more effective employee performance and to provide the critical inputs for an equal employment opportunity program. Throughout the lesson the reader is made aware of the principal approaches to job analysis and the techniques to be used in preparing job descriptions and specifications. This lesson concludes by discussing important challenges related to how jobs are designed, ergonomics, employee empowerment, various employee involvement techniques and flexible work schedule. Special emphasis is given to employee teams and the characteristics of all successful teams.

    Recruitment and Careers
    In earlier lessons we stressed that many HR challenges center on the idea that organizations increasingly compete on the basis of their employee talents and capabilities. In this lesson we will discuss various sources and approaches to expanding the talent pool in organizations. Specifically, we will discuss both external sources of recruitment and internal sources (such as promotion, transfers, and the like). Finally, at the end of the lesson, we devote special attention to the recruitment and career development of minorities and women.

    Employee Selection
    There is perhaps no more important topic in human resources management than employee selection. If it is true that organizations succeed or fail on the basis of talents of employees, then managers directly influence that success by the people they hire. Regardless of whether the company is large or small, hiring\he best and the brightest employees lay a strong foundation for excellence. Alternatively, it is the inordinate amount of time they spend trying to fix bad selection decisions. In addition, employment equity legislation has also provided an impetus for making sure that the selection process is done well. The bottom line is that good selection decisions make a difference.

    Appraising and Improving Performance
    In this lesson there is an extensive discussion of the development of an appraisal program, including various sources of appraisal information. In addition, several performance appraisal methods are described within the categories of trait, behavior, and results approaches. A summary of the various appraisal methods is discussed.

    Semester 3
    Managing Compensation
    This lesson discusses some of the more common objectives and policies of an organization’s compensation program. It acquaints the student with the typical components of the wage mix that serve to determine the rate of pay employees are to receive. The lesson also explains the methods by which the relative worth of the job within an organization can be measured to provide the basis for developing a pay structure. Since government regulations play an important role in the determination and administration of compensation payments, the pertinent federal laws relating to the subject are discussed. Finally, the lesson introduces the student to current issues relating to equal pay for comparable worth, as well as the problems of wage compression, living wage laws, and low organizational salary budgets.

    Pay-for-Performance: Incentive Rewards
    This lesson acquaints students with the different types of financial incentive plans that have been developed to motivate each category of employees within an organization. More important, it seeks to make students aware of the criteria for a successful incentive plan and how effective financial incentives are in comparison with other forms of motivation. Some of the new financial incentive plans for management employees are described. Also discussed in the lesson are the various forms of gainsharing incentive plans. The advantages and disadvantages of gainsharing plans are reviewed. The lesson concludes by discussing the conditions that have led to the introduction of employee stock ownership plans.

    Employee Benefits
    This lesson should enable students to recognize the changes occurring in the types and value of benefits employees receive as part of their total compensation. It also should make students aware of current benefit trends and the significant cost of these benefits to the employer as a percentage of their labour costs. Current benefits programs are examined in terms of their intended contributions to an organization’s objectives and the extent to which these objectives are being realized. This lesson is organized into four major sections, starting with general information about benefits programs. The other sections cover employee benefits required by law, discretionary major employee benefits, and finally, a discussion of the types of employee services that are provided.

    Safety and Health
    Because of the emphasis given to safety and health in HRM, we continue to have an expanded lesson devoted to these topics. The legal requirements are presented at the beginning of the lesson to emphasize the importance of employer compliance with federal and provincial regulations. A separate section is then devoted to creating a safe work environment, with a focus on the HR aspects of a safety program. This section is followed by one on creating a healthy work environment, with special attention to health assistance programs. The lesson concludes with a discussion of managing stress.

    Employee Rights and Discipline
    In this lesson we discuss employee rights, workplace privacy, and employee discipline. At a general level, the rights of employees are those described in the employment contract.

    The Dynamics of Labour Relations
    This lesson is intended to help students better understand the labour movement and the forces contributing to it. It discusses the objectives and functions of contemporary labour unions and how unions are organized and administered. A portion of the lesson is devoted to the discussion of labour legislation, so students can understand how and why such legislation has developed and how it affects contemporary labour relations. Also included is a discussion of labour relations in the public sector, where unions have experienced significant growth. This discussion should help students to recognize the principal differences between the nature of collective bargaining in the public and in the private sectors.

    International Human Resources Management
    We begin the lesson with a brief overview of the different organizational form’s companies adopt (international, multinational, global, and transnational). In this lesson we emphasize the importance of understanding cultural and environmental issues in international business. The lesson covers issues related to staffing, training, appraisal, compensation, and labour relations in an international environment.

    Creating High-Performance Work Systems
    This lesson covers the underlying philosophies of high involvement, the anatomy of HPWS practices, processes for implementing high-performance work systems, and criteria for judging their impact on performance.

     

  • Fees & Expenses


    Fees Apply for this Academic Year.

    • Registration: $100.00
    • Textbooks: $1025.00
    • Shipping: $61.00
    • Tuition: $3,999.00

    Total Tuition & Fees: $5,185.00