Development Services Worker

COURSE INFORMATION:

Admission Requirements
  • Grade 12 or OSSD Equivalent
  • Mature Student with Wonderlic SLE min. score 60 on test
  • Bring Your Own Device (BYOD): As a student in this online program, you will require a mobile computing device that meets the specifications outlined by your program.

Prior to Practicum:

  • Medical form from a Canadian licenced physician stating fitness to complete the practicum and absence of communicable diseases
  • Negative Police Check, including vulnerable sector


Fees & Expenses

Tuition fees listed are in effect for this academic year.
Registration Fee: $100.00
Textbooks: $1,900.00
Postal Shipping Fee: $100.00
Tuition Fee: $12,745.00
Optional Fee: $175.00
Total Tuition & Fees: $15,020.00

Advanced Standing

“Theory Component Credit – students may receive credit for their theory hours if they have taken previous related courses by challenging the module test, and if application, the performance demonstrations for that course. The student must achieve a minimum passing score of 70% on the test/demonstration. The amount of credit is then determined on an individual basis after an interview the Admissions Director and a review of the student’s transcript of marks for the previous courses taken. The maximum credit that can is granted is 30 hours of the total 1000 theory hours. *Practicum Component Credit – students may also receive credit for Practicum Placement hours. The student will require a letter from his/her employer(s) indicating the length of employment, duties performed and a general evaluation of the student’s abilities as a caregiver. Credit will be granted for the associated validated number of field work hours. Students must have a copy of their CEA skills passbook completed by one employer and this passbook will be required as part of the validation process of granting advanced standing for the practicum component. All requests for advanced standing of courses must be processed through the completion of the advanced standing application form and accompanied with a $100.00 non-refundable fee. Applications must be completed in full and supporting documentation attached, including copies of course transcripts in English.”

College Eligibility
Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent; OR
Academic and Career Entrance (ACE) Certificate; OR
General Educational Development (GED); OR
Mature Student status (19 years of age or older and without a high school diploma at the start of the program).
Call the Admissions Office at 1 (800) 267-2577 for more details. Academic prerequisites for this program may be obtained free of charge through Academic Upgrading.

 

 


COURSE OVERVIEW

Upon successful completion of the Developmental Services Worker program, graduates
are prepared to act in a professional, ethical, competent and accountable manner.
They work in accordance with human rights, the Developmental Services Worker
Standards of Practice, legal and ethical requirements and policies and practices of the
developmental services sector. They have a legal responsibility to maintain zero
tolerance of all forms of abuse.

Students of the Developmental Services Worker program are trained to provide
person-directed supports and services for people with developmental disabilities in a
manner that is respectful and fosters self-determination and empowerment. Additionally,
graduates are prepared to promote the development of inclusive communities.

In practice, graduates demonstrate qualities such as creative problem solving, resiliency
and initiative as outlined in the Developmental Services Human Resources Strategy
Core Competencies. They are able to teach skills using strategies that are adapted to
individual learning styles and to communicate effectively using a variety of forms.

Students are trained to maintain the health and safety of the people they support;
provide health care, perform health care procedures and administer medications within
their scope of practice. Developmental Services Worker program graduates can work in a
variety of areas including education, accommodation, employment support, advocacy
and recreation.

Graduates of the Developmental Services Worker program recognize that ongoing
professional development is essential to ensure that they continue to provide quality
support to people with developmental disabilities.

Students are employed as support workers by developmental services agencies which
offer accommodation, community participation, employment support and leisure support
services. Graduates are also employed as educational assistants by boards of
education.

Learning Outcomes

The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to:

Knowledge Objectives
1. Discuss the ongoing professional development activities for educational support in compliance with relevant education related legislation supporting learners with exceptionalities in the inclusive classroom
2. Describe relevant education legislation, health and safety guidelines to promote positive school climates
3. Discuss cultural diversity strategies to promote positive school climates
4. Discuss the educational implications and applications of research on child development, cognitive science, learning, motivation, teaching, and assessment.
5. List the cultural factors shaping education to foster empathetic, positive and pro-social behaviour in school climates
6. Discuss development theory and research to promote the development of independence of learners with exceptionalities
7. Discuss theory, research and practice to promote the development of independence and pro-social behaviour of learners with mental and health exceptionalities
8. Discuss theory, research and practice to promote the independence and pro-social behaviour of learners with physical and multiple exceptionalities
9. Discuss theory, research and practice to promote the independence and pro-social behaviour of learners with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
10. Outline communication strategies specific to exceptionalities to enable educational support programs of instruction in the inclusive classroom when working with exceptional students and other members of the classroom team
11. Discuss the importance of self-care and professional development strategies while working as a member of the classroom team
12. Describe the types of assistive technology used in the classroom to promote ongoing development of independence when working with members of the classroom team to support learners with exceptionalities
13. Discuss essential behavioural management techniques used when working with students with exceptionalities to promote empathetic, positive and pro-social behaviour in the classroom and promote ongoing development of independence
14. Outline the educational support programs of instruction that are delivered to children with exceptionalities while promoting and supporting positive school climates in the inclusive classroom
15. List the steps that are required to collaborate on the development and revision of the individual education plan for students with exceptionalities while working with members of the classroom team and student’s families
16. Outline the process of assisting students with exceptionalities to promote the development of independence across their lifespan while working with members of the classroom teams and student’s families
17. Describe the unique strategies and skills required to collaborate and work with diverse family members for children with exceptionalities and lead by example to promote empathetic, positive and pro-social behaviour in the inclusive classroom
18. Outline the methods of providing cultural support that enhances and improve outcomes of indigenous children in educational settings while creating a safe and caring environment

Skill Objectives

1. Engage in ongoing professional development activities for educational support in compliance with relevant education related legislation supporting learners with exceptionalities in the inclusive classroom
2. Apply relevant education legislation, health and safety guidelines to promote positive school climates
3. Apply cultural diversity strategies to promote positive school climates
4. Utilize the educational implications and applications of research on child development, cognitive science, learning, motivation, teaching, and assessment
5. Embrace the cultural factors shaping education to foster empathetic, positive and pro-social behaviour in school climates
6. Apply development theory and research to promote the development of independence of learners with exceptionalities
7. Apply theory, research and practice to promote the development of independence and pro-social behaviour of learners with mental and health exceptionalities
8. Apply theory, research and practice to promote the independence and pro-social behaviour of learners with physical and multiple exceptionalities
9. Apply theory, research and practice to promote the independence and pro-social behaviour of learners with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
10. Work with exceptional students and other members of the classroom team, implement communication strategies specific to exceptionalities to enable educational support programs of instruction in the inclusive classroom
11. Apply self-care and professional development strategies while working as a member of the classroom team
12. Work with members of the classroom team to support learners with exceptionalities to use assistive technology in the classroom and promote ongoing development of independence
13. Apply essential behavioural management techniques when working with students with exceptionalities to promote empathetic, positive and pro-social behaviour in the classroom and promote ongoing development of independence
14. Working with members of the classroom team, deliver educational support programs of instruction to children with exceptionalities promoting and supporting positive school climates in the inclusive classroom
15. Working with members of the classroom team and student’s families collaborate on the development and revision of the individual education plan for students with exceptionalities
16. Working with members of the classroom teams and student’s families, assist students with exceptionalities to promote the development of independence across their lifespan
17. Apply the unique strategies and skills required to collaborate and work with diverse family members for children with exceptionalities and lead by example to promote empathetic, positive and pro-social behaviour in the inclusive classroom
18. Apply cultural support to enhance and improve outcomes of indigenous children in educational settings and to create a safe and caring environment

Your Career

Upon successful completion of the Developmental Services Worker program, graduates are prepared to act in a professional, ethical, competent and accountable manner. They work in accordance with human rights, the Developmental Services Worker Standards of Practice, legal and ethical requirements and policies and practices of the developmental services sector. They have a legal responsibility to maintain zero tolerance of all forms of abuse.

Subject Titles

__________________________________________________________________________________________

1. Introduction to the Field of Developmental Services

2. The Nature of Developmental Disabilities

3. Autism Spectrum Disorders

4. Grammar and Writing Skills for the Health Professional

5. Communications Disorders

6. Developmental Psychology Across the Lifespan

7. Working with Families and Persons with Developmental Disabilities

8. Person Directed Supports and Services for Persons with Developmental Disabilities

9. Behavioral Support Techniques

10. Health and Wellness Principles

11. Dual Diagnosis; Mental Health and Persons with Developmental Disabilities

12. Building Community

13. Adult Development and Aging

14. Essentials of Pharmacology

15. Augmentative and Alternative Communication Systems

16. Practicum Preparation and Placement I Community Setting (120 Hours)

17. Introduction to Educational Psychology in Canada

18. Paraprofessionals (The Role of the Classroom Education Assistant)

19. Individual Education Plan

20. Communication Strategies for Inclusive Education

21. Professional Development; Competencies and Standards of Practice

22. Self-Care Strategies for the Developmental Services Worker

23.Computer Basics (Word, Excel. Power Point)

24. Practicum Preparation and Placement II Educational Setting (120 Hours)

25. Indigenous Canada

Course Descriptions

Introduction to the Field of Developmental Services

Graduates will learn the soft skills and basic clinical skills for those entering health care training programs or considering a career in health care. Students will also learn the developmental services worker core competencies and those required by all health care professions, including communication, infection control, and professionalism along with the steps to developing critical thinking skills of thinking like a health care professional.

Indigenous Canada

The Nature of Developmental Disabilities

In this introductory subject to the nature of developmental disabilities, students will learn about working with people who have developmental difficulties by gaining an understanding of their needs to provide support around communication, quality of needed support and services and issues that are based on a day-to-day basis. Rather than focus on any one type of developmental disability, this subject serves as the framework for my in-depth studies through the Developmental Services Worker program.

Autism Spectrum Disorders

In this subject, students will learn about Autism Spectrum Disorders evidence-based practices and approaches. Students will also learn the current trends in research and practice including special research, diversity, and issues that will help clarify the concepts and application of the learning.

Grammar and Writing Skills for the Health Professional

Graduates will learn how to combine correct grammar with medical language as they prepare professional reports and documentation. Focusing on basic grammar, students will learn entry-level health guidelines along with practical knowledge needed in real-world practice. Building on the basic’s students will then focus on more advanced grammar and writing skills.

Communications Disorders

In this subject, students will learn the characteristics, needs, and strengths of students with communication exceptionalities, including students with speech and language disorders. Students will also learn specific characteristics and classroom communication strategies and how to make appropriate adjustments to student’s unique verbal and non-verbal communication styles.

Developmental Psychology Across the Lifespan

Graduates will learn the essentials of child and adolescent development. Students will explore the causes and complexities of human development and acquire a knowledge of developmental principles that will assist them with their roles when working with persons with developmental challenges, their families and other members in the capacity of support in the lives of developing individuals.

Working with Families and Persons with Developmental Disabilities

In this subject, students will focus on the families of special needs children to understand the challenges and needs of these families as well as the skills and strategies required of developmental services workers and educators working with such families. Students will also learn the common legal and ethical concerns surrounding children with special needs and their families and the unique approaches required due to the diversity in families with special needs children, cultural considerations, age, and communication styles.

Person Directed Supports and Services for Persons with Developmental Disabilities

Graduates will learn the principles and values of person directed planning and facilitation when working with persons with developmental disabilities. The goal of this work is to enable persons with developmental disabilities to live independently as possible in the community and to support their full inclusion in all aspects of society. Students will also learn the six underlying principles that support the person directed planning and facilitation process.

Behavioral Support Techniques

In this subject, students will focus on observable behaviours and the environmental factors that affect their expression. Student will look at what demystifies stereotypical beliefs and misconceptions regarding the use of reinforcement, punishment, and self-control and learn techniques based on a sound theoretical and empirical foundation.

Health and Wellness Principles

Graduates will be guided in the principles of adopting a healthy lifestyle. From the physical and mental to social and sexual, students will learn the concepts of health, including mind, body, and spirit to take charge of on one’s health. Students will also learn the skills and habits formed along with the choices made and the way to live day by day that shape one’s health and future to live a fulfilling life and apply the core principles when working with persons with developmental disabilities.

Dual Diagnosis; Mental Health and Persons with Developmental Disabilities

In this subject, students will learn about the disorders in the context of typical development and developmental pathways. For each disorder (across descriptions of clinical presentation, course, and treatment), students will learn the continuity between typical and atypical development; risk and resilience; complex models of psychopathology; children in relationships over time; children in larger social contexts (e.g., neighborhoods); and the holistic nature of development (e.g., thinking about the child’s abilities and strengths as well as his or her disorder). Students will also be exposed to neuroscience research and greater emphasis on the multiple environments in which children are embedded to assist with understanding of child and adolescent psychopathology and empirically supported treatment.

Building Community

Graduates will learn the essentials of community development and capacity building with a focus on developing potential and enhancing community living. Students will learn how community development is initiated and the steps in the community development process. Students will learn how to use Asset Based Community Development (ABCD) strategies to strengthen communities and include people at risk for marginalization.

Adult Development and Aging

In this subject, students will be exposed to a bio-psychosocial framework, covering the specific ages-stages of adult development and aging. Students will experience the connections between research and application with a focus on “positive aging” and the gains and losses people experience across adulthood.

Essentials of Pharmacology

Graduates will learn the principles of pharmacology and calculations in a simplified step-by-step process. Students will also learn medication preparation, supplies, and specific information on each route of administration by following administration checklists allow the learner to put the knowledge into practice. Students will also learn how to organize drugs by classifications including their purpose, side effects, cautions, interactions, and contraindications.

Augmentative and Alternative Communication Systems

In the subject students will learn about augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) as communication methods used to supplement or replace speech or writing for those with impairments in the production or comprehension of spoken or written language. Students will also learn that AAC is used by those with a wide range of speech and language impairments and be introduced to assistive technology used in the educational setting to aid communications.

Practicum Preparation and Placement, I Community Setting (120 Hours)

The practicum component of the Developmental Services program involves the student in two placement opportunities; one in the community setting and the other one in the education setting. Students will apply their knowledge and practical application studies to the real-world gaining insightful experience in working with persons with developmental disabilities.

Introduction to Educational Psychology in Canada

Graduates will learn information and ideas that are drawn from research in educational psychology and how this learning can be applied to solve the everyday problems of teaching. Students will also learn the educational implications and applications of research on child development, cognitive science, learning, motivation, teaching, and assessment.

Paraprofessionals (The Role of the Classroom Education Assistant)

In this subject, students will learn the fundamentals of inclusive teaching, the most effective general teaching practices, and ways to differentiate instruction for specific content areas. Targeted teaching strategies show ways to improve all students’ memory, attention, motivation, study skills, and peer interaction. Students will also learn validated strategies and learn to demonstrate why particular techniques are best practice and most effective.

Individual Education Plan

Graduates will learn the specialized requirements when working with students with
special needs to develop, implement, and monitor high-quality Individual Education Plan (IEP). Students will also learn the recommended five step process that is used to meet the requirements and standards with a focus on customizing the Individual Education Plan (IEP) to the unique need of each individual student.

Communication Strategies for Inclusive Education

In this subject, students will learn the characteristics, needs, and strengths of students with communication exceptionalities, including students with speech and language disorders. Students will also learn specific characteristics and classroom communication strategies and how to make appropriate adjustments to student’s unique verbal and non-verbal communication styles.

Professional Development; Competencies and Standards of Practice

Graduates will review the essentials of how to get a job in health care including the employment cycle, job research, writing resumes, completing applications and preparing for interviews. Students will also learn the DSW Standards of Practice, Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics.

Self-Care Strategies for the Developmental Services Worker

In this subject, students will learn the tools they need to create their own personal balance between caring for themselves and caring for others. Students will also learn the tools of resiliency and self-care action plans to assist them within their work along with ongoing opportunities for professional development to remain current in their field of work.

Computer Basics (Word, Excel. Power Point)

Graduates will be provided with the resources and guidance to develop skills in Microsoft Office 2016 applications, focusing on Windows 10, and the basics of Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Students will be provided with guided practice as well as independent projects, improve it projects and challenge projects to development and enhance Microsoft Office 2016 proficiency.

Practicum Preparation and Placement II Educational Setting (120 Hours)

The practicum component of the Developmental Services program involves the student in two placement opportunities; one in the community setting and the other one in the education setting. Students will apply their knowledge and practical application studies to the real-world gaining insightful experience in working with persons with developmental disabilities.

Every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy of information provided on our website. The College reserves the right to modify any course, program, curriculum, fee, timetable, or campus location at any time.


TRAINING LOCATIONS

North Bay Campus or Online – www.nativetc.com