Youth Worker Diploma Program

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  • Program TitleYouth Worker
    Credential: Diploma
    Delivery: Online
    Program Length: 3 Semesters (One year)
    Program Availability: Full time or Part time
    Offered: This program is available starting every Monday.

    Program Description


    A career as a youth worker can be mentally draining and difficult, but it is also one of the most rewarding jobs. You see firsthand how your help leads to better lives. There are thousands of children and youth each year who could benefit from the support of a professional in this field. Our youth worker diploma programs provide students with the knowledge and experience needed to make a positive impact on those who need it.

    This program is designed to prepare the motivated and mature individual for a career working with a wide range of troubled youth. The youth worker is educated to recognize and address the social and emotional needs of children and adolescents and is also concerned with the total individual, his or her family, education and rehabilitation. A strength-based philosophy committed to creating competence in youth is the cornerstone of the program curriculum.

    Students have fifty-two (52) weeks to complete their program requirements, starting from the date of their first course.

    Learning Outcomes


    1. Accept the responsibility to, both personally and professionally, walk in balance.
    2. Analyze historical and current legislation and social systems to effectively advocate for a problem-solve with individuals and families while maintaining respect for the customs and protocols of Aboriginal people.
    3. Develop and maintain therapeutic relationships, which respect Aboriginal values beliefs, and customs to promote overall well being and facilitate positive change for individuals, families and communities.
    4. Assess, support and counsel to promote balance within families.
    5. Communicate effectively in oral, written and non-verbal forms to enhance the quality of intra-cultural and cross-cultural services.
    6. Apply skills and knowledge within both Aboriginal and mainstream contexts.
    7. Identify and initiate Aboriginal methods of treatment.
    8. Perform a range of tasks associated with case management.
    9. Work cooperatively with communities and advocate for systemic change by identifying, accessing, and utilizing systems.

    Your Career


    Graduates from the program are prepared for the general practice of child and youth care work in community settings with both First Nations and non-First Nations children, youths and their families.

    General practice in these settings calls for individuals who are willing and able to work cooperatively with other community professionals at tribal health centres, schools, friendship centres, community and social service agencies, hospitals and corrections facilities.

  • Admission Requirements


    College Eligibility

    • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent; OR
    • Academic and Career Entrance (ACE) Certificate; OR
    • General Educational Development (GED); OR
    • Mature Student status (19 years of age or older and without a high school diploma at the start of the program).

    Call the Admissions Office at 1 (800) 267-2577 for more details. Academic prerequisites for this program may be obtained free of charge through Academic Upgrading.

    Application Process
    Program intake – Apply to this program by visiting our Registration page. If you are entering into this program as a mature student please attach your resume when submitting your registration information online.

    Field Placement
    NETC field placement agencies may require a police record check for criminal offences, a vulnerable sector check and/or a current acceptable record of immunization. Students will be required to provide this documentation directly to their field placement prior to the start of the placement and at their own expense. Students who cannot meet these requirements may have limited field placement opportunities.

  • Courses


    2015/2016 Academic Year

    Semester 1
    Communication Strategies
    Study Skills Strategies
    Foundations of Development
    Language, Learning, and Cognitive Development
    Social and Personality Development
    The Ecology of Development

    Semester 2
    At-Risk Children and Youth: The Ecology Of Problems
    Families, Schools, and Skills
    At-Risk Categories
    Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment Approaches
    Business Writing Skills Development
    Communication Strategies
    Effective Planning and Scheduling

    Semester 3
    Introduction to Professional Counseling
    Stages and Skills of Counseling
    Assessing Client Needs
    Defining Strategies and Selecting Interventions
    Termination and Follow-Up

    Every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy of information provided on our website. The College reserves the right to modify any course, program, curriculum, fee, timetable, or campus location at any time.

  • Course Descriptions


    Semester 1
    Communication Strategies
    The primary aim of this course is to enable participants with an understanding of the impact that their communication skills can have on others, while exploring the different ways in which developing these skills can make it easier for them to succeed in the work force.

    Study Skills Strategies
    This course will enable students to assess their current study skills and plan for improvement. Students will practice time-management techniques for successful studying. Students will learn to develop powerful reading skills and practice memory techniques to enhance ability to learn and improve test performance. This course will also help students to develop specific study skills for mathematics and related subjects and implement an action plan to improve them.

    Foundations of Development
    This course explores the historical roots of developmental psychology that have led to our current understanding of child development. Students will examine the role of scientific method in all of psychology, especially how it relates to developmental psychology. Students will discuss the fundamental components of key developmental theories and review central issues in the study of development. This course will describe the basic structure of chromosomes and genes. Students will discuss the heredity–environment and the key concepts involved in behavioural genetics. This course examines what is known about the role of heredity in intellectual performance, personality, and mental illness. This course will identify and describe the three stages of prenatal development (germinal, embryonic, and fetal), listing the characteristics and major events that occur during each stage. Students will gain an understanding of the differences between the trimesters of a pregnancy and prenatal stages of the developing child. This course examies postpartum depression and outlines the factors that are typically related to the development of postpartum depression. Students will examine the physical changes associated with puberty in both males and females and describe the general reactions to the physical changes associated with puberty in both male and female adolescents. This course will aslo describe the impact of environmental factors such as nutrition, illness, and emotional stress on the growth and development of a child.

    Language, Learning, and Cognitive Development
    This course identifies three key components in the definition of learning. Students will learn to distinguish between positive and negative reinforcement, and positive and negative punishment. This course examines the potential negative side effects associated with the use of punishment and discuss some guidelines for using punishment to affect change in a child’s behaviour. This course will outline the developmental changes that typically occur in short-term memory and identifies maturational and social influences that will affect a child’s speed of processing.

    Social and Personality Development
    Students will be introduced to the different ways in which intelligence is defined and can be measured and discuss the factors that are most likely to influence how intelligence is measured and understood. In this course students will examine the relationship between the development of a sense of self and cognitive developments. Students will examine the general course of the development of self-esteem and relational self-worth and describe Harter’s hierarchical model of self-esteem and discuss the research evidence in support of her theory. This course explores how individual differences in self-evaluation and achievement motivation may arise from differential experience within the domains of attachment security, culture, parenting style, home environment, and peer interactions. Students will discuss basic developmental trends in the development of gender-role stereotypes, and explain what gender intensification is and examine basic developmental trends in the development of sex-typed behaviour. This course will define the term aggression and distinguish between hostile and instrumental forms of aggressive behaviour. In this course students will identify the cultural and subcultural factors that are correlated with overall levels of aggression, including how a coercive home environment may promote aggressive behaviour. Students will also examine the successful and unsuccessful methods that parents and teachers use to counter aggression and antisocial behaviour.

    The Ecology of Development
    This course will define socialization and identify three functions of the socialization process that are common to all cultures. Students will identify the two dimensions of parenting found to be most influential on a child’s overall development and compare and contrast the four parenting styles that have been identified, and discuss the developmental outcomes that have been associated with each. Students will examine the difference between behavioural and psychological controls and how each type of disciplinary style contributes to child outcomes. This course will identify the characteristics in parents that may increase the likelihood that they will abuse or neglect their children, and identify the characteristics in children that may increase their risk for becoming a target of abuse or neglect. Students will compare and contrast the characteristics that are associated with childhood sexual abuse versus other forms. Students will also discuss how development is influenced by the media to which students are exposed and examine the role of schools and peers in the process of socialization.

    Semester 2
    At-Risk Children and Youth: The Ecology Of Problems
    In this course students will discuss and define the term at risk. This course will present an ecological model for unifying various concerns for children and adolescents who are at risk. This course will provide an overview of environmental and societal issues that impact young people and families. Students will discuss legal and ethical issues that must be considered by helping professionals who work with children and adolescents.

    Families, Schools, and Skills
    In this course students will examine two primary microsystems that serve to reduce or enhance risky behavior: the family and the school. Families and schools provide important resources to offset negative behavior. In families and schools, young people learn attitudes and skills that help them to survive and thrive. Students will discuss resiliency and identify five important constructs that contribute to healthy, prosocial behavior.

    At-Risk Categories
    In this course students will examine five specific categories that reflect some of the principal problem areas for at- risk youth: school dropout, substance use, risky sexual behavior, delinquency and youth violence, and youth suicide. Although these topics represent a substantial portion of child and adolescent problem areas, they do not reflect all areas of concern. Nevertheless, we believe these core topics are highly representative of other problems as well. With each topic we provide ( a) a conceptualization of the problem, ( b) a discussion of the scope of the problem, ( c) characteristics of the problem and strategies to identify and assess it, ( d) consequences of the problem, and ( e) specific intervention approaches that helpers need to know to reduce the problem. In addition, for each category we examine a major prevention and intervention strategy or two that address the specific areas described.

    Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment Approaches
    Students will explore a wide range of empirically supported prevention and intervention strategies to help young people. This course will describe a systematic conceptual framework and model of prevention, early intervention, and treatment of children and teenagers at risk. Students will review resiliency and the five Cs of competency discussed earlier in the program and provide a variety of interventions demonstrated to be helpful: social skills, cognitive- behavioral strategies, and other approaches aimed at decreasing negative behaviors and attitudes and increasing positive ones. This course will describe several intervention programs that can be used to help young people by harnessing prosocial peer group influences. This course also focuses on family- based interventions. Students will review interventions that have been found very helpful for working effectively with children, youth, and families in need.

    Business Writing Skills Development
    Students will explore the techniques used to create clear, concise business communication (letters, memos, informal and semi-formal reports). This couse ill review grammar, consider appropriate business language and develop the skills needed to research, prepare and present a formal written report.

    Communication Strategies
    The primary aim of this course is to enable participants with an understanding of the impact that their communication skills can have on others, while exploring the different ways in which developing these skills can make it easier for them to succeed in the work force.
    Effective Planning and Scheduling

    Semester 3
    Introduction to Professional Counselling
    In this course, we introduce a number of concepts and conditions that are fundamental to the counseling process. In so doing, we provide a structure for the remainder of the book. Counseling must be viewed within a context. The factors that contribute to that context include philosophy, current theoretical premises, and culture— in other words, the social milieu. That milieu changes as a society changes. And, of course, it changes when one moves from one society or culture to another. In addition, we address helper qualities that are universal, crossing cultures and time. Our ultimate objective is to help you, the student, begin to identify yourself within these parameters and to do some introspection regarding how your personal qualities match those of the professional counselor.

    Stages and Skills of Counselling
    The overall objective of this course is to present the structure of the counseling process and how that structure helps you determine what the counselor should be doing. The beginning point of counseling is a time when you and your client must decide, both independently and mutually, whether this particular pairing of persons and personalities offers the potential for growth and change. Beyond that decision, you must reach agreement on what the problem is; how counseling might assist in changing problematic circumstances; what counseling activities would help produce that change; and, finally, when the helping effort should conclude. This course examines this process from the client’s perspective, which will be different from your own. The second part of this course examines the first of the five stages in the counseling process: establishing rapport and a positive therapeutic relationship. Counselor qualities and behaviors and cliequalities and input that are associated with therapeutic relationships are discussed. The increased likelihood that counseling will be a multicultural experience is recognized as an important factor in forming the relationship. This course addresses relationship issues that will likely be part of that multicultural counseling experience, including the counselor’s responsibility for the client’s cultural identity and sensitivity as well as his or her own.

    Assessing Client Needs
    Students will examine the process by which the counselor and client can work collaboratively to define what that desirable outcome might or will be. Students will also examine the first of the five stages in the counseling process: establishing rapport and a positive therapeutic relationship. Counselor qualities and behaviors and clienqualities and input that are associated with therapeutic relationships are discussed. The increased likelihood that counseling will be a multicultural experience is recognized as an important factor in forming the relationship. This course addresses relationship issues that will likely be part of that multicultural counseling experience, including the counselor’s responsibility for the client’s cultural identity and sensitivity as well as his or her own.

    Defining Strategies and Selecting Interventions
    In this course, we examine the process by which counselors can assess the client’s presenting problems. That process involves the collection of information relevant to problem definition, conceptualization of that information into a cogent picture of the client in his or her world, and consideration of client resources. Cultural factors that affect client perceptions of their world and counselor perceptions of client problems are introduced. Clinical assessment in counseling may occur at an in- take interview prior to assignment to a counselor. Or it may occur during the assigned counselor’s sessions with the client. When it occurs prior to counselor assignment, it typically includes paper- and- pencil assessment instruments in addition to information gathering in the interview(s). There are two approaches to clinical assessment: the psych diagnostic method and the psychometric method. In this course, we shall examine the psych diagnostic approach, which has as its purpose the evaluation of client problems and contextual conditions in order to determine what type of counseling is needed, what types of interventions should be used, and how counseling is likely to progress.

    Termination and Follow-Up
    Termination, the fifth and final stage of counseling, is the transition from assisted functioning to counseling- free functioning by the client. In this course, we discuss the dynamics that affect this transition, the counselor’s role and responsibilities in seeing that this transition occurs, and the occasional necessity to make client referrals to other mental health professionals. It is important to keep in mind through each of the counseling stages that the ultimate goals of any counseling relationship are success and termination. How this is accomplished is the focus of this course.

    Writing Reports and Proposals
    In this course students will learn four stages of report writing, and nine tips for effective writing that will help them create materials that are engaging, understandable, and most important, get read. In addition, students will learn about using persuasive language to write effective proposals.

  • Fees & Expenses


    Tuition fees listed are in effect for the 2015-2016 academic year.

    • Application Fee: $100.00
    • Textbooks: $975.00
    • Postal Fee: $49.00
    • Tuition Fee: $3,825.00

    Total Tuition & Fees: $4,949.00