Youth Recreation Management Diploma Program

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  • Program Title: Youth Recreation Management
    Credential: Diploma
    Delivery: Online
    Program Length: 3 Semesters (One year)
    Program Availability: Full time or Part time
    Offered: This program is available starting every Monday.

    Program Description


    This three-semester diploma program is designed to provide recreation service practitioners with the opportunity to acquire specialized skills, knowledge and attitudes related to youth and essential youth services. As a graduate of the youth recreation management program, employment opportunities would exist in many agencies, including: your first nation communities, municipalities, youth centres, non-profit agencies, group homes and private industry.

    Students have a total of fifty-two (52) weeks to complete their program requirements, starting from the date of their first course.

    Learning Outcomes


    1. Develop, implement and evaluate inclusive recreation, leisure and wellness programs and events for individuals, groups and
    2. Communities which respond to assessed needs, interests, abilities and that use available resources and incorporate best practices.
    3. Apply administrative and customer service skills to support the delivery of recreation, leisure and wellness programs, events and services.
    4. Analyze, develop and implement marketing strategies to reach diverse individuals, groups and communities for programs, events, services and facilities using current communication technologies.
    5. Contribute to the development of fiscally sustainable and responsible recreation, leisure and wellness programs, events and services using current and relevant principles and practices of business, finance and social entrepreneurship.
    6. Supervise, lead and support the development of staff and volunteers involved with recreation, leisure and wellness programs, events and services.
    7. Apply safety and accessibility practices to the efficient operation and administration of recreation and leisure facilities and settings.
    8. Promote the benefits and values of recreation, leisure and healthy active living and recommend inclusive programs, events and services to individuals and groups.
    9. Apply community development strategies which engage citizens and community partners while advocating for healthy communities.
    10. Develop strategies for ongoing personal and professional development as a recreation and leisure services professional.

    Your Career


    The Youth Recreation Manager will consult with youth and organizations that represent youth to determine their needs and develop programs in response to those needs. The Youth Coordinator may deliver programs in a variety of locations and may have to transport, lift and carry equipment and supplies. The Youth Recreation Manager will have to spend long hours sitting and using office equipment and computers, which can cause muscle strain, and may also be involved in a number of high energy activities.

    The Youth Recreation Manager may have to manage a number of projects at one time, and may be interrupted frequently to meet the needs of youth and organizations. The Youth Coordinator may find the environment to be busy, noisy and will need excellent organizational and time and stress management skills to complete the required tasks.

  • Admission Requirements


    College Eligibility

    • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent; OR
    • Academic and Career Entrance (ACE) Certificate; OR
    • General Educational Development (GED); OR
    • Mature Student status (19 years of age or older and without a high school diploma at the start of the program).

    Call the Admissions Office at 1 (800) 267-2577 for more details. Academic prerequisites for this program may be obtained free of charge through Academic Upgrading.

    Application Process
    Program intake – Apply to this program by visiting our Registration page. If you are entering into this program as a mature student please attach your resume when submitting your registration information online.

  • Courses


    Semester 1
    Study Skills Strategies
    Communications Strategies
    Workplace Ergonomics
    Conflict Resolution
    Marketing and Advertising Communications
    Writing Reports and Proposals

    Semester 2
    Essential Components of Quality Physical Education
    Physical Education Program Design
    Effective Instructional Strategies
    Behaviour Management
    Teaching Physical Education
    Assessment, Evaluation, Grading, and Program Accountability
    Programming for Persons with Disabilities
    Intramurals, Sport Clubs, and Athletics

    Semester 3
    Introductory Activities
    Technology to Promote and Monitor Physical Activity
    Physical Fitness
    Healthy Lifestyles
    Promoting Motivation, Cooperation, and Inclusion
    Sports Activities
    Lifestyle and Outdoor Adventure Activities

    Every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy of information provided on our website. The College reserves the right to modify any course, program, curriculum, fee, timetable, or campus location at any time.

  • Course Descriptions


    Semester 1
    Study Skills Strategies
    This course will enable students to assess their current study skills and plan for improvement. Students will practice time-management techniques for successful studying. Students will learn to develop powerful reading skills and practice memory techniques to enhance ability to learn and improve test performance. This course will also help students to develop specific study skills for mathematics and related subjects and implement an action plan to improve them.

    Communications Strategies
    The primary aim of this course is to enable participants with an understanding of the impact that their communication skills can have on others, while exploring the different ways in which developing these skills can make it easier for them to succeed in the work force.

    Workplace Ergonomics
    Students will learn the basic principles of ergonomics, how to design an ergonomic workstation, outlines ergonomic practices for common postures and movements, and how to identify ergonomic hazards and minimize their effects.

    Conflict Resolution
    In this course students will learn how to recognize how their own attitudes and actions impact others, effective techniques for dealing with difficult people, strategies for dealing with anger, and how to cope with the difficult people and situations.

    Marketing and Advertising Communications
    This course addresses the theoretical and practical aspects of modern marketing communications. Graduates will be able to perform advertising/communications functions using a variety of media techniques. Topics covered include marketing and sales, marketing with social media, basic internet marketing, marketing for small businesses, basic internet marketing, marketing with social media, telemarketing: using the telephone as a sales tool, project management and public speaking.

    Writing Reports and Proposals
    In this course students will learn four stages of report writing, and nine tips for effective writing that will help them create materials that are engaging, understandable, and most important, get read. In addition, students will learn about using persuasive language to write effective proposals.

    Semester 2
    Essential Components of Quality Physical Education
    The course presents varying professional perspectives of the field as well as current trends and issues that influence physical education program quality. Physical education is defined as the phase of the general educational program that focuses on movement experiences to contribute to the total growth and development of each student. Issues affecting physical education programs are described. Components of quality programs and the teaching/coaching conflict are presented as well. Characteristics of successful programs are clearly identified. Finally, the essential characteristics of quality secondary physical education programs are presented.

    Physical Education Program Design
    This course describes a systematic approach to curriculum development and provides suggested formats for organization and evaluation of curriculum. A sequence of steps is offered for planning and designing a comprehensive curriculum. The concepts of scope, sequence, breadth, depth, and balance help ensure that the curriculum will meet the needs of all students. The course also provides a discussion on the importance and advantages of a vision and philosophy behind curriculum development, plus the advantages of articulating the curriculum from kindergarten through 12th grade.

    Effective Instructional Strategies
    This course describes the importance of developing sound department and program policies prior to instruction. Stages of pre-instruction decisions and planning associated with assuring quality instruction are discussed. Unit plan and lesson plan writing are included, as is the explanation of the components of a three-part lesson plan, which ensures that students receive a balanced approach to instruction. Reflection, as a necessary component of quality instruction and evaluation, is described. Essential elements of effective instruction and management related issues are also addressed in this course.

    Behaviour Management
    This course covers many ways of teaching class organization skills through physical activity. Emphasis is on a positive and constructive approach to moving students quickly into instructional settings. Responsible behavior is an important part of teaching, and students are expected to know what acceptable behavior is and how to resolve conflict in a nonphysical manner. Preventing behavior problems is always more important than dealing with
    problems after they occur. Organizing an environment that offers a behavior management component helps students become good citizens. Much discussion and instructional advice is given to maintain and increase desirable behavior while also decreasing undesirable behavior or implementing behavioral correction techniques. A number of strategies are offered, from reprimands to behavior contracts.

    Teaching Physical Education
    The purpose of this course is to explore the variety of instructional styles that exist and how they can be used to enhance instruction. There is no single best style for all situations. Each style has advantages that will be effective depending on the type of students, specific activities, and desired objectives. The teaching styles covered in this course include direct instruction, task style, mastery learning style, individualized style, cooperative learning style, and inquiry style.

    Assessment, Evaluation, Grading, and Program Accountability
    This course offers a broad overview of assessment, evaluation, and grading techniques. It
    addresses assessment, evaluation, and grading issues for physical education. The psychomotor (physical), cognitive (knowledge), and affective (social) learning domains are targeted. Sample evaluation assessment for physical skills, cognitive knowledge, and affective behavior are offered. These include scoring rubrics, checklists, rating scales, personal interviews, and self-evaluation logs. Grading is always a difficult issue, and it can be a daunting task for physical education teachers because such philosophical differences exist. Both sides of the grading issue are presented in this course so teachers can see the varying viewpoints that must be considered.

    Programming for Persons with Disabilities
    This course focuses on the most common types of disabilities and on ways to modify activities and determine categories of placement for students with disabilities. Assessment plays a vital part in determining proper placement of the disabled student into physical education. Moving a student to a less restrictive learning environment should be based on achievement of specified competencies necessary in the new environment. Inclusion involves the practice of placing students with disabilities into classes with able peers. An individualized learning environment increases opportunities for successful inclusion. The student with the disability should be held to high expectations and not be permitted to use a disability as a crutch or as an excuse for substandard work.

    Intramurals, Sport Clubs, and Athletics
    This course examines the role of intramurals, physical activity programs, and athletics in the total program. These opportunities should be available for all students and be conducted in a manner that contributes to educational objectives. The intramural program is a voluntary activity that enables students to develop interest and competence in a wide range of physical activities. Intramurals have the potential to offer something of interest to all students in the program. The programs provide a balance of competitive and recreational activities. Student interest surveys give direction to activity offerings in intramural and physical activity club programs. Leadership of the program is a joint arrangement that includes students and volunteers.

    Semester 3
    Introductory Activities
    This course provides rationale for utilizing daily introductory activities for physical education and presents a variety of activity ideas that can be used to start each lesson. Introductory activities are vigorous in nature, consist primarily of gross locomotor movement, are not rigidly structured, and allow for considerable freedom of movement. They are meant to engage students in physical activity very quickly and serve as a psychological and physiological warm-up for the ensuing portion of the lesson. They are characterized by minimal instruction time and maximum movement time. Introductory activities should be selected with the interests, developmental levels, and physical abilities of the students in mind.

    Promoting and Monitoring Physical Activity
    This course explains the differences between physical fitness and physical activity and how different students will choose one over the other based on their personal needs. The Physical Activity Pyramid gives students a concrete explanation of how they should plan for and incorporate physical activity into their daily lifestyles. The focus is on adding at least sixty minutes of moderate to vigorous activity to their daily routine.

    Physical Fitness
    The purpose of this course is to explain the importance of including physical fitness activities in the lesson plan and identifying novel strategies and techniques that could be used to implement fitness into the lesson structure. A variety of exercises and techniques that can be used to develop physical fitness are discussed. Fitness is defined in two categories: health related and skill related. Health-related fitness is selected for the vast majority of people. A select few who care about their athletic performance or personal accomplishments will choose skill-related fitness as their outcome of choice.

    Healthy Lifestyles
    This course focuses on teaching basic concepts of health and the related components that can be enhanced within the physical education setting. The course offers the methodology for holding discussions to develop an understanding and insight into behavior necessary to maintain an optimum level of health. A state of general health and personal functioning helps determine the quality of life. Discussion sessions must include the opportunity for students to have the psychological freedom to explore alternative lifestyles. A difficult skill for students to learn is independent decision making based on careful consideration of alternatives and consequences rather than peer pressure. Teachers can help students understand the requisites of quality health by offering a discussion session that is structured so students can feel comfortable. Focus setting, clarifying, acknowledging, and silence are behaviors teachers need to learn to use when conducting discussion sessions.

    Promoting Motivation, Cooperation, and Inclusion
    The activities in this course offer students and teachers a change of pace from longer units of instruction. Most students find the activities personally challenging because they require some new and different skill sets. The activities can be used on rainy day schedules, shortened-period days, or as a short one- or two-week unit. The activities incorporate equipment not often used in typical physical education programs and don’t require a large instructional space. Some students who do not enjoy group or team activities will be motivated by the opportunity to learn individual skills.

    Sports Activities
    This course presents a series of beginning level units for a variety of team and individual sports. These units are designed to serve as a framework for developing units that meet the needs of your individual students. These units are not all-inclusive, but provide lead-up activities and skills needed to be proficient in the individual game. Each unit includes a sequence for teaching game skills, ideas for effectively teaching these skills, options for lesson skill/game organization, lead-up activities and games, as well as potential student learning objectives. The activities include both traditional and modified team and individual sports. Additional references are provided to assist in further development of units.

    Lifestyle and Outdoor Adventure Activities
    These lifestyle activities can easily be incorporated into students’ lives, both now and in the future. Physical educators should try especially hard to offer as many of these activities as possible. These activities will become more important to students as they grow older and as they try to keep activity in their lifestyle. Students should start learning and doing these activities early in their lives so that hopefully they will continue them into the future. These activities expand the scope of physical education programs for teachers and students. Many physical education programs have added popular outdoor adventure activities to the secondary physical education curriculum. The possibilities have included rock climbing, rappelling, caving, canoeing/kayaking, fly-fishing, downhill skiing, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, scuba/snorkeling, geocaching, orienteering, outdoor initiative/cooperative activities, and hiking/backpacking.

  • Fees & Expenses


    Tuition fees listed are in effect for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    • Application Fee: $100.00
    • Textbooks: $975.00
    • Postal Fee: $49.00
    • Tuition Fee: $3,825.00

    Total Tuition & Fees: $4949.00