Post-Secondary Counsellor

  • Program Title: Post-Secondary Counsellor
    Credential: Diploma
    Delivery: Online
    Program Length: 3 Semesters (1 year)
    Program Availability: Part-time or Full-time
    Offered: This program is available starting every Monday.

    Program Description


    Post‐Secondary Counsellors are vital to the education department and your community as a whole. They may have three primary job functions, research and develop relationships with a broad range of post‐secondary institutions, private career colleges and training centres, focusing specifically on college academic education and training programs, work with students to develop their post‐secondary plan and help them find the best possible fit, and coordinate with advisory, department heads and other staff as necessary to help organize an effective post‐secondary strategy for the student.

    Students have a total of fifty-two (52) weeks to complete their program requirements, starting from the date of their first course.

    Learning Outcomes


    The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to:

    • Provide educational support in compliance with pertinent education-related legislation, standards, regulations and policies, health and safety legislation and regulations, as well as organizational policies, practices and procedures.
    • Develop and implement strategies to promote and support positive school climates that contribute to a safe, caring and secure educational setting.
    • Lead by example to promote empathetic, positive and pro-social behaviour in all learners to facilitate the development of social competence in learners.
    • Monitor, document and report on the behaviour, performance and progress of learners.
    • Prepare and present a plan for engaging in ongoing personal and professional development to promote competence in the educational support field.
    • Develop and maintain professional relationships, which adhere to professional, legal and ethical standards aligned to community counsel.

    Your Career


    As a professional academic advisor, you will be providing information, advice and guidance to help individuals navigate transitions in education and training. This diploma program is intended for individuals interested or working in career development, or academic advisors in education authority departments. You will gain the communication and assessment skills to facilitate, motivate and work successfully with community members, educational institutes and community committees.

  • Admission Requirements


    College Eligibility

    • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent; OR
    • Academic and Career Entrance (ACE) Certificate; OR
    • General Educational Development (GED); OR
    • Mature Student status (19 years of age or older and without a high school diploma at the start of the program).

    Call the Admissions Office at 1 (800) 267-2577 for more details. Academic prerequisites for this program may be obtained free of charge through Academic Upgrading.

    Application Process
    Program intake – Apply to this program by visiting our Registration page. If you are entering into this program as a mature student please attach your resume when submitting your registration information online.

    Field Placement
    NETC field placement agencies may require a police record check for criminal offences, a vulnerable sector check and/or a current acceptable record of immunization. Students will be required to provide this documentation directly to their field placement prior to the start of the placement and at their own expense. Students who cannot meet these requirements may have limited field placement opportunities.

  • Courses


    Semester 1
    Basic Study Skills
    Office Applications
    Introduction to School Counseling
    Comprehensive School Counseling Programs
    Program Design, Implementation, and Evaluation

    Semester 2
    Individual Counseling and Group Processes
    Collaboration and Consultation
    Student Assessment
    Workplace Ergonomics
    Research Skills Development

    Semester 3
    Educational and Career Development
    Evaluation of School Counseling Programs
    Professional Ethics
    Career Counseling Strategies and Techniques
    Interpersonal Communication

    Every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy of information provided on our website. The College reserves the right to modify any course, program, curriculum, fee, timetable, or campus location at any time.

  • Course Descriptions


    Semester 1
    Basic Study Skills
    This course will enable students to assess their current study skills and plan for improvement. Students will practice time-management techniques for successful studying. Students will learn to develop powerful reading skills and practice memory techniques to enhance ability to learn and improve test performance. This course will also help students to develop specific study skills for mathematics and related subjects and implement an action plan to improve them.

    Office Applications
    Students will learn the skills needed to take full advantage of Microsoft Office applications and features. Students will learn how to manage data in spreadsheets, compose error-free documents, organize email, build engaging presentations, and much more with Microsoft Office

    Introduction to School Counseling

    This course will review the relationship between school counseling and the broader counseling profession. The course will outline historical events and legislative actions that influenced the development of the school counseling profession. Students will examine elements and issues related the professional identity of school counselors. The course will also briefly explore the philosophy of comprehensive school counseling programs and implications for school counselor identity.

    Comprehensive School Counseling Programs
    This course presents the elements of a comprehensive school counseling program. The course defines school counseling, states the purpose of school counseling programs, outlines the elements and services of a program, and surveys the facilities, materials, and personnel needed in a comprehensive program. The course will also describe the processes for establishing a school counseling program.

    Program Design, Implementation, and Evaluation
    This course examines the process of designing career intervention programs. The course describes phases and steps for developing comprehensive counseling services in schools. Students will discuss how technology has influenced counseling practice in schools and will continue to do so in the future. This course also reviews: time management and program evaluation.

    Semester 2
    Individual Counseling and Group Processes
    This course presents counseling and group procedures as two complementary services of a comprehensive program. The course defines counseling, describes the school population who needs and benefits from counseling, and examines the goals of counseling, and illustrates the counseling process.  The course also describes group processes used specifically with students: group counseling and group guidance. Students will review various group procedures used by school counselors, and explores the advantages and limitations of group counseling and group guidance.

    Collaboration and Consultation
    This course defines the role of school counselors as collaborators with other professionals and agencies. The course describes the different ways consultation is used by school counselors and examines consulting roles. Students will learn about the many individuals, professionals, and agencies with whom school counselors create and maintain working relationships on behalf of students, parents, and teachers. This course presents an overview of the consulting skills and processes that enable counselors to establish and facilitate collaborative relationships with these different participants.

    Student Assessment
    This course reviews standardized tests, testing procedures, non-standardized methods, and use of the DSM-IV-TR by counselors in the schools. Students will review appraisal processes used by schools and school counselors to measure students’ abilities, attributes, achievement, and interests. The course describes common assessment instruments and other techniques used by school counselors. Students will explore the procedures used by counselors to select appropriate assessment instruments and other techniques to use in schools. The course will outline the conditions for ensuring the proper use of standardized assessment instruments in schools.

    Workplace Ergonomics
    Students will learn the basic principles of ergonomics, how to design an ergonomic workstation, outlines ergonomic practices for common postures and movements, and how to identify ergonomic hazards and minimize their effects.

    Research Skills Development
    This course introduces students to several different tools so that they can become a stronger researcher and can create proposals, reports, or simply find good information and review it. Students will start by learning basic research skills techniques like reading, memory recall, note-taking, and planning. Participants also learn about different kinds of outlines, and how to move to writing, editing, and polishing the final work while sharing how to use different sources such as libraries, journals, and the Internet.

    Semester 3
    Educational and Career Development
    This course emphasizes the primary targets of educational planning and career development. Students will examine the primary purpose for having professional counselors practice in school settings. The course defines the role of career development and career planning in comprehensive school counseling programs.

    Evaluation of School Counseling Programs
    This course examines two aspects of counselor accountability—program evaluation and counselor effectiveness. The purpose behind training counselors in these evaluation processes is three-fold: (l) to help counselors gather data with which to plan their own professional development; (2) to enable counselors to make a case of their value and worth for the decision-makers who plan school programs and services; and (3) to invite counselors to participate in research efforts that lend credibility and validity to accepted practices and the future development of their profession. The course will identify types of data that are useful to school counselors during the evaluation process.

    Professional Ethics
    This course addresses ethical issues facing both career counselors and those working in other counseling specialties that do career development work. The chapter presents the ethical standards considers legal issues related to the ethical practice of school counseling.

    Career Counseling Strategies and Techniques
    This course introduces basic information about conducting individual and group career counseling, emphasizing strategies appropriate for the 21st century.  It includes topics such as providing counseling-based career assistance, providing support in career counseling, and attending to life structure issues.  It also introduces a framework for conducting career counseling.

    Interpersonal Communication
    This course explores human communication. The focus is for students to become aware of their present ways of communicating and to build on the communication skills they have already established. The goal is to enable students to become more successful in communicating with others by examining the cognitive activities that shape communication, exploring the elements and process of communication, becoming aware of the dynamics of relational communication and practicing the skills of effective communication.

  • Fees & Expenses


    Tuition fees listed are in effect for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Application Fee: $100.00
    • Textbooks: $975.00
    • Postal Fee: $49.00
    • Tuition Fee: $3,825.00

    Total Tuition & Fees: $4,949.00