Community Economic Development

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  • Program Title: Community Economic Development
    Credential: Diploma
    Delivery: Online
    Program Length: 3 Semesters (1 year)
    Program Availability: Part-time or Full-time
    Offered: This program is available starting every Monday.

    Program Description


    The Community Economic Development diploma program blends the strengths of two management perspectives. This management program establishes a strong traditional management foundation while addressing the issues that today’s millennial students will face in their future careers

    Your First Nation supports and enhances business in the community, and is always looking for ways to improve communication with the business sector. The Economic Development Officer works directly with clients, site selectors and consults to help facilitate business development and the site selection process. The Economic Development Officer program provides skills and competencies to help the community businesses grow and prosper in your economic development position and career. Let us be your first point of contact for business development and career advancement.

    Students have fifty-two (52) weeks to complete their program requirements, starting from the date of their first course.

    Learning Outcomes


    The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to:

    • Demonstrate the steps and processes in conducting sustainable development planning.
    • Identify the central issues that constitute the area of community economic development.
    • Discuss the effects and opportunities of economic restructuring and technological change in communities.
    • Practice and develop skills and competencies associated with effective leadership and management.
    • Use their understanding of the basic management functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling to manage effectively.
    • Apply principles of corporate sustainability, corporate social responsibility and ethics to support an organization’s business initiatives.
    • Assess and use current concepts/systems and technologies to support an organization’s business initiatives.
    • Conduct and present research to support business decision making.
    • Plan, implement and evaluate projects by applying project management principles .
    • Perform work in compliance with relevant statutes, regulations and business practices.
    • Apply human resource practices to support management objectives and the organization’s goals.
    • Use accounting and financial principles to support the management and operations of an organization.
    • Understand the generally accepted principles of accounting for a business enterprise or venture.
    • Develop reasoned and practical methods of analyzing, evaluating, and utilizing accounting information.
    • Understand the importance of accounting to strategic economic and business decisions.

    Your Career


    The economic development officer is responsible for continuously developing and maintaining knowledge required to-do the job by understanding, embracing, and contributing to the community’s economic development plan, as an approach towards effective planning, by collaborating effectively to coordinated economic development.

    The economic development officer must be familiar with background materials and information relating to the First Nation Community and the political processes. Must demonstrate a non-political approach to communicate and foster relationships with politicians, elders and community members.

    The economic development officer must use a variety of qualitative and quantitative methods to perform continuous assessment of economic development needs, including maintaining an inventory of existing businesses, sector activities and current human resources (Labor force) in the community.

  • Admission Requirements


    College Eligibility

    • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent; OR
    • Academic and Career Entrance (ACE) Certificate; OR
    • General Educational Development (GED); OR
    • Mature Student status (19 years of age or older and without a high school diploma at the start of the program).

    Call the Admissions Office at 1 (800) 267-2577 for more details. Academic prerequisites for this program may be obtained free of charge through Academic Upgrading.

    Application Process
    Program intake – Apply to this program by visiting our Registration page. If you are entering into this program as a mature student please attach your resume when submitting your registration information online.

    Field Placement
    NETC field placement agencies may require a police record check for criminal offences, a vulnerable sector check and/or a current acceptable record of immunization. Students will be required to provide this documentation directly to their field placement prior to the start of the placement and at their own expense. Students who cannot meet these requirements may have limited field placement opportunities.

  • Courses


    Semester 1
    Basic Study Skills
    Introduction To Community Economic Development
    Accounting Concepts and Procedures
    Introduction To Marketing
    Community Development I
    Community Analysis
    Negotiations and Contract Management
    Project Management

    Semester 2
    Planning in Aboriginal Communities
    First Nations Law and Community Economic Development
    Venture Development
    Contemporary First Nation Issues
    Case Studies In Community Economic Development
    Community Development II
    Introduction to Management
    Introduction To Computing Systems

    Semester 3
    Mathematics I
    Introduction To Statistics
    Introduction to Finance
    Human Resources Management
    Interpersonal Communications
    Conflict and Dispute Resolution
    Research Skills Development
    Business Communication

    Every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy of information provided on our website. The College reserves the right to modify any course, program, curriculum, fee, timetable, or campus location at any time.

  • Course Descriptions


    Semester 1
    Basic Study Skills

    This ourse will enable students to assess their current study skills and plan for improvement. Students will practice time-management techniques for successful studying. Students will learn to develop powerful reading skills and practice memory techniques to enhance ability to learn and improve test performance. This course will also help students to develop specific study skills for mathematics and related subjects and implement an action plan to improve them

    Introduction To Community Economic Development
    This course clarifies the importance of Community Economic Development as a strategy for the development of economically marginalized and depressed communities. The course introduces students to the theory and practice of Community Economic Development, and provides them with an insight as to combining both theory and practice to help build capacity and sustainability within a community. It promotes a future role and job for the Community Economic Development Officer, and highlights how the successful completion of the course could help increase the development of healthy Aboriginal communities.

    Accounting Concepts and Procedures
    This course is an in-depth study of the concepts, principles and practice for external business financial reporting. Consideration of issues related to the measurement and reporting of cash, receivable, inventories, property, plant and equipment, intangibles, investments, revenue and expense recognition and cash flows are discussed. In addition, current financial statement presentation issues (balance sheet, income statement and cash flow statement) are analyzed to gain an appreciation for the impact of generally accepted accounting principles on the business environment as a whole. Recognition and measurement of liabilities (short and long-term), the structure of stockholders’ equity, taxes, leases, pensions, and accounting changes and error analysis are also covered in the course. Current generally accepted standards for business reporting are also analyzed, as is their effect on the presentation of financial results by corporations and other entities.

    Introduction To Marketing
    In this course, students will be introduced to the concepts, activities, and decisions that relate to the marketing function in business and non-business organizations in community, regional, national and international settings. There will be a focus on development and implementation of marketing strategies through the use of marketing mix, variables of product, price place, and promotion. Ethical issues in marketing will be discussed, and the creative use of Internet marketing entertained.

    Community Development I
    This course examines Community Economic Development (CED) within a global setting. Additional CED strategies and the development of global theories on CED are explored. This course will promote roles and jobs for CEDOs (Community Economic Development officers) in their communities and globally.

    Community Analysis
    This course examines how communities work. Five community functions – political, social, cultural, economic, and physical – will be identified and will be looked at from research, investigative, assessment, and analytical perspectives. The course highlights how data on the five functions may be collected, and how the analysis of the data can help Community Economic Development officers clarify challenges and opportunities and use the information to direct and inform action planning.

    Negotiations and Contract Management
    This course focuses on how to successfully negotiate in a variety of organizational situations. In addition, participants learn the basic features of entering into, and successfully managing, a contract. Both negotiations and contract management are examined in this course through experiential models and practices, focusing particularly on applications with a First Nations setting. The learning process is based on a combination of lecture inputs to introduce core concepts, individual and class exercises organizational skills, and allows students to monitor their own progress in the course.

    Project Management
    Examines project management from a First Nations perspective, using models based on First Nations community projects. Experiential processes supplement theories for an introductory approach to managing projects, including finances, planning, scheduling and problem-solving. This course is targeted for those who are employed and/or have administrative experience.

    Semester 2
    Planning in Aboriginal Communities
    This course examines economic, environment and social factors that impact or enhance Community Economic Development (CED) project design. Both successful and unsuccessful CED projects are examined to highlight CED strategies, principles and concepts that have positive impact on sustainable development planning in Aboriginal and small communities.

    First Nations Law and Community Economic Development
    This course will provide the student with knowledge of contemporary First Nations Law and Economic Development. The student will learn about constitutional law, case law, and public policy. This course will discuss the concepts of self-government and also of community development. Analysis will include studying the Indian Act and also studying contemporary economic initiatives. In addition, this course will discuss the communities’ control over services, creation of corporations, and economic development. Systemic issues such as historical background, history of treaties, and Canada-First Nation relations will be studied. This course will provide a historical understanding of contemporary events as well as current legal and political developments..

    Venture Development
    This course introduces students to the field of “entrepreneurship”. Students examine the concepts, activities and new ways to meet the needs and demands of entrepreneurs. The course examines these themes: (1), the characteristics of the entrepreneur, (2), family businesses, (3), home-based businesses, (4), new product design, (5), business plan, (6) franchising and other alternatives. There will be a focus on opportunities for entrepreneurial development in Aboriginal communities facing challenges such as: downsizing, restructuring, information and communication technologies and globalization.

    Contemporary First Nation Issues
    This coure will provide the student with knowledge of contemporary First Nation issues. Students will examine First Nation peoples, employment, health and cultures. Other issues are: historical background, history of treaties, and Canada-First Nation relations, First Nation land claims, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, government policy, and Canadian law. Contemporary issues such as treaty negotiations, Bill C-31, and self-government initiatives will be analyzed.

    Case Studies In Community Economic Development
    This course examines some of the significant community economic development initiatives in Aboriginal communities. At the heart of the course lies a simple point: “Aboriginal people are taking greater responsibility for determining and managing their economies” but do they have the tools to help them along? This course provides lessons from case studies in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities. As a survey course, it integrates CED theory and practice. It empowers local communities through CED that balances economic, social, and ecological objectives..

    Community Development II
    This course is an in-depth study of practical and theoretical applications of “community organizing” case study from the U.S. The course introduces students to the concepts, principles and practice of community organizing. The course explores the current movement of community development which include: some of the sophisticated networks of foundations, corporations, intermediaries, technical assistance providers, with local, state, and federal agencies in the design and implementation of community economic development and organizing strategies.

    Introduction to Management
    This course provides the student with an introduction to management. It is designed to introduce students to the world of organizations. Although this course will not necessarily make the student a “manager,” it will provide them with a better understanding of the workings of organizations and those who manage them. The ideas and concepts associated with management will be practiced in class through experiential learning in a team context. The material will not only clarify the things managers do but also focus on developing a conceptual awareness of the issues facing managers and organizations in the ever-changing and increasingly competitive world economy.

    Introduction To Computing Systems
    Introduction to Computing Systems explains how computer systems, comprised of hardware and software, work. Computing systems are used as a tool, and are intended to increase operation efficiencies in business. Having a clear understanding of computing systems is important to those who often work with limited resources. In addition to enabling the student in understanding how to implement and utilize computing systems, this course will review examples of how computing systems and information technology have been used in economic development.

    Semester 3
    Mathematics I
    This course is designed to build a mathematical base for persons planning to become involved in administration and/or business management. In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the need for business professionals to be able to use mathematics in research, statistics, problem solving and decision-making. This course is designed to expose students to the areas of mathematics that they are likely to require in their future jobs or areas of study. Topics include linear equations, sets and counting, probability, matrices, linear programming and solving financial problems.
    Introduction To Statistics
    This course is designed for students who require a course in statistical concepts, principles and methods in preparation for working with statistical studies and analyzing data in their chosen field of study. The focus of this course will be on the logic and interpretation of statistical concepts and techniques in business settings. Much work will be required. This course introduces the student to basic statistical methods for analyzing both a quantitative and qualitative information, including graphic methods, sampling, descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. The relationship of statistics to research methods is discussed, applications to business decisions is stressed.

    Introduction to Finance
    The objective of this course is to develop a framework within which financial decisions can be examined. This framework broadly covers the theoretical foundations of finance, the Canadian institutional framework and the techniques used in financial management.

    Human Resources Management
    This course provides an introduction to personnel management including organization of the personnel functions; recruitment and selection, interviewing and counseling, job descriptions and evaluation, compensation and salary administration, management development and performance appraisal, training and staffing planning, safety and occupational health. The course places particular emphasis on the practical applications of personnel policies and procedures, on personnel’s relationship to management and management’s responsibilities to employees.

    Interpersonal Communications
    An introduction to interpersonal communications, interpersonal relationships, and development of interpersonal communication skills required in the role of community economic development officer.

    Conflict and Dispute Resolution
    This course describes how conflict can be rooted in real or perceptual differences and can be functional or dysfunctional. We present strategies and tactics – both formal and informal – through which conflicts can be resolved. Students will understand how functional conflict is associated with differences over substantive issues related to desired outcomes or processes, or inherent in the roles of the individuals. Effective apologies, stressing the importance of expressing regret, accepting responsibility, and offering a remedy are also discussed.

    Research Skills Development
    This course introduces students to several different tools so that they can become a stronger researcher and can create proposals, reports, or simply find good information and review it. Students will start by learning basic research skills techniques like reading, memory recall, note-taking, and planning. Participants also learn about different kinds of outlines, and how to move to writing, editing, and polishing the final work while sharing how to use different sources such as libraries, journals, and the Internet.

    Business Communication
    This course identifies the characteristics of effective written communications and provides some suggestions for productivity tools that can be used when preparing business documents. Students learn how to compose effective letters, memoranda, e-mails and business reports, and, how to use appropriate e-mail and instant message communication techniques.

  • Fees & Expenses


    Tuition fees listed are in effect for the 2015-2016 academic year.

    • Application Fee: $100.00
    • Textbooks: $975.00
    • Postal Fee: $49.00
    • Tuition Fee: $3,825.00

    Total Tuition & Fees: $4,949.00