Classroom Educational Assistant

  • Program Title: Classroom Educational Assistant
    Credential: Diploma
    Delivery: Online
    Program Length: 3 Semesters (One year)
    Program Availability: Full time or Part time
    Offered: This program is available starting every Monday.

    Program Description


    The Educational Assistant diploma program prepares graduates for a rewarding career supporting student success in the classroom. In this program you will learn how to work with diverse students in an inclusive environment and understand how to help them to succeed in school. As an Educational Assistant, you will be working in pre-school, Head Start and Grades Kindergarten -12 within a school, but with the qualifications that extend to job opportunities in specialized settings outside of schools.

    The outstanding students in this program are flexible thinkers who are creative and caring, and believe that every child can succeed. You interact well with others and can work collaboratively and independently while able to take direction from your colleagues. You are a good communicator. You listen, speak and write well. The most important quality however, is a genuine love of learning and a positive attitude to motivate and inspire students as you guide them to be the very best they can be!

    The First Nations beliefs, culture and language are an integral part of the courses offered and within this lays a need to also remain current and relevant to new changes that could impact the community as a whole.

    Students have fifty-two (52) weeks to complete their program requirements, starting from the date of their first course.

    Learning Outcomes


    1. conduct oneself in an ethical, competent and accountable manner in all professional relationships.
    2. provide person-directed supports and services that respect and promote self-determination for people with developmental disabilities.
    3. provide for the safety of people with developmental disabilities, self and others in compliance with all applicable legislation, regulations and standards of practice.
    4. support health and well-being of people with developmental disabilities.
    5. employ and adapt formal and informal strategies to support the learning of people with developmental disabilities.
    6. provide leadership in the development of inclusive communities.
      develop professional and personal plans that enhance job performance and well-being.

    Your Career


    Graduates of the Educational Assistant diploma program are prepared to assist individuals who have physical, cognitive, and psychiatric disabilities. As education assistants, they work in schools and, under the supervision of the teacher, provide classroom support. They can also pursue careers in community support agencies. With an Educational Assistant diploma, graduates can also continue into university degree programs in social work, child and youth care, or education. Some graduates have started their own community support businesses and hold contracts with a variety of government and non-government agencies. Graduates can also continue onto a generic Human Services diploma and onto university degree programs in social work, child and youth care, or education.

  • Admission Requirements


    College Eligibility

    • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent; OR
    • Academic and Career Entrance (ACE) Certificate; OR
    • General Educational Development (GED); OR
    • Mature Student status (19 years of age or older and without a high school diploma at the start of the program).

    Call the Admissions Office at 1 (800) 267-2577 for more details. Academic prerequisites for this program may be obtained free of charge through Academic Upgrading.

    Application Process
    Program intake – Apply to this program by visiting our Registration page. If you are entering into this program as a mature student please attach your resume when submitting your registration information online.

  • Courses


    2015/2016 Academic Year

    Semester 1
    Basic Study Skills
    Learning, Teaching, and Educational Psychology
    Cognitive Development and Language
    Self, Social and Moral Development
    Learner Differences and Learning Needs
    Language Development, Language Diversity, and Immigrant Education
    Culture and Diversity
    Behavioural Views of Learning
    Cognitive Views of Learning

    Semester 2
    The Learning Sciences and Constructivism
    Social Cognitive Views of Learning and Motivation
    Motivation in Learning and Teaching
    Creating Learning Environments
    Classroom Assessment, Grading, and Testing
    Understanding Individuals with Physical, Health, and Multiple Disabilities
    Physical Disabilities
    Health Impairments and Congenital Infections
    Curriculum and Individualized Educational Planning

    Semester 3
    Task and Situation Analysis
    Assistive Technology
    Augmentative and Alternative Communication
    Adaptations for Personal Independence
    Adaptations in Physical Education, Leisure Education, and Recreation
    Reading Instruction and Adaptations
    Writing Instruction and Adaptations
    Science and Social Studies Instruction and Adaptations
    Mathematics Instruction and Adaptations

    Every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy of information provided on our website. The College reserves the right to modify any course, program, curriculum, fee, timetable, or campus location at any time.

  • Course Descriptions


    Semester 1
    Basic Study Skills
    This course will enable students to assess their current study skills and plan for improvement. Students will practice time-management techniques for successful studying. Students will learn to develop powerful reading skills and practice memory techniques to enhance ability to learn and improve test performance. This course will also help students to develop specific study skills for mathematics and related subjects and implement an action plan to improve them.

    Learning, Teaching, and Educational Psychology
    This course defines the essential characteristics of effective teaching and describes the knowledge that expert teachers draw on. Students will discuss the value of studying educational psychology and explore the roles that theory and research play in the field. Students will also discuss the greatest concerns of beginning teachers.

    Cognitive Development and Language
    This course will provide students with an understanding of development that takes into account three agreed-upon principles. Students will discuss three continuing debates about development and current consensus on these questions. Students will summarize some current research on the physical development of the brain and possible implications for teaching. This course will examines how principles and stages presented in Piaget’s theory of cognitive development influence current educational research and practice. This course also examines how the principles presented in Vygotsky’s theory of development influence current educational research and practice.

    Self, Social and Moral Development
    In this course students will examine general trends and group differences in physical development through childhood and adolescence. Students will discuss how the components of Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological model influence development. Students will examine the relationship between parenting styles and children’s development and explore general trends and group differences in the development of self-concept and identity. Students will discuss how positive peer relations (friendships) and negative peer relations (aggression) affect children’s social development. This course will also examine current theories of moral development.

    Learner Differences and Learning Needs
    In this course students will discuss the potential problems in categorizing and labelling students. This course will examine current hierarchical theories and multiple theories of intelligence and explain how intelligence is measured, and discuss what these measurements tell teachers. Students will discuss the values and limitations of considering students’ learning styles and explore the implications of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms for your teaching. This course will enable students to understand the special educational needs of students with learning challenges and recognize the special educational needs of students who are gifted and talented.

    Language Development, Language Diversity, and Immigrant Education
    This course will enable students to understand how language develops and know how to support emergent literacy. Students will discuss what happens when children develop two languages. This course will address whether dialect differences affect learning. Students will discuss whether English immersion or bilingual instruction is better for English language learners. This course will define sheltered instruction, and explain how it works and discuss how teachers can recognize special learning needs and talents when they do not speak their students’ first language.

    Culture and Diversity
    In this course students will examine how social class, ethnicity, and race influence teaching and learning in a diverse society. Students will discuss the meaning of stereotype threat, and examine its possible effects on student achievement. This course will describe the development of gender identity and the role of gender in teaching and define multicultural education. Students will learn to apply research on diversity to the creation of culturally compatible classrooms.

    Behavioural Views of Learning
    This course defines learning, and distinguish among the processes involved in learning though contiguity, classical conditioning, and operant conditioning. This course will enable students to distinguish between positive and negative reinforcement, and presentation and removal punishment. Students will learn apply behavioural approaches to modifying behaviour in and out of the classroom. Students will discuss newer approaches to applied behavioural analysis, including functional behavioural assessment and self-management. Students will also discuss contemporary challenges to behavioural theories of learning, and address concerns about their application.

    Cognitive Views of Learning
    This course will enable students to differentiate between behavioural and cognitive views of learning. Students will examine early information processing models of memory and recent cognitive science models, including working memory and cognitive load theory. In this course students will discuss the role of different kinds of knowledge in learning and remembering. This course will describe the processes involved in storing and retrieving different types of information from long-term memory. Students will learn to identify some developmental and individual differences in memory and describe processes and strategies involved in becoming knowledgeable.

    Semester 2
    The Learning Sciences and Constructivism
    In this course students will examine the collaborative approach that led to the interdisciplinary field of learning sciences. This course will explain different perspectives on constructivism as a theory of learning and teaching and identify the common elements in most contemporary constructivist theories. Students will learn to apply constructivist principles to classroom practice and evaluate the use of community-based activities/service learning. This course will also describe positive and negative influences of technology on the learning and development of children and adolescents.

    Social Cognitive Views of Learning and Motivation
    This course outlines the basic principles of social cognitive theories of learning and motivation including triarchic reciprocal causality, modelling/observational learning, self-efficacy, and agency. Students will discuss the roles of observation and self-efficacy in learning. This course will describe important components of self-regulated learning and enable students to apply self-regulated learning principles to teaching.

    Motivation in Learning and Teaching
    This course defines motivation, and differentiates among five theoretical explanations for learner motivation. Students will discuss how learners’ needs influence their motivation to learn and examine the different kinds of goal orientations and their influences on motivation. This course defines how students’ beliefs and attributions can influence motivation and describes the roles of interests, curiosity, emotions, and anxiety in motivation. This course will also examine how teachers can influence and encourage students’ motivation to learn.

    Creating Learning Environments
    This course will relate academic learning time and student cooperation to creating and maintaining a classroom climate conducive to academic achievement and socio-emotional well-being. Students will explore the research on the roles of rules, procedures, and consequences in classroom management. Students will discuss how the physical environment can support or interfere with learning, and plan an appropriate arrangement of your classroom. This course will identify strategies for preventing and addressing student misbehaviors, including bullying and characterize successful teacher-student communication.

    Classroom Assessment, Grading, and Testing
    This course will enable students to distinguish among evaluation, measurement, and assessment, and describe the functions of each. Students will examine norm-referenced and criterion-referenced assessments and discuss how reliability, validity, and absence of bias are used to understand and judge assessments. This course will describe two kinds of traditional classroom testing, and how authentic assessment can be used as an alternative to traditional assessments.
    Students will examine the effects of grading on students and the types of strategies teachers can use to communicate to parents about grades. Students will discuss how to interpret common standardized test scores (percentile rank, z scores). This course will also identify some of the current issues in standardized testing.

    Understanding Individuals with Physical, Health, and Multiple Disabilities
    In this course students will explore critical issues in the lives of individuals with physical, health, or multiple disabilities. Students will evaluate educational service delivery systems and the challenges of effective educational inclusion for students with physical or multiple disabilities. This course will identify teacher competencies specific to serving students with physical, health, or multiple disabilities and apply them to the evolving roles of special education teachers. This course will enable students to understand past and present perspectives on individuals with physical, health, or multiple disabilities. Students will compare traditional and evolving definitions, classifications, and models of disability. Students will learn to use disability classifications and labels that are objective, appropriate, and dignified.

    Health Impairments and Congenital Infections
    Students will learn to incorporate strategies for moderating the effects of health impairments and infectious diseases through instructional activities and social interactions. Students will also learn to implement universal precautions and infectious disease transmission prevention in educational environments. This course will define and describe the following health impairments: asthma, diabetes, and cystic fibrosis. This course will describe several associated conditions that frequently accompany specific health impairments and infectious diseases. Students will discuss the potential impact of health impairments and infectious diseases on physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development.

    Curriculum and Individualized Educational Planning
    This course will describe discerning features of the curricular options that can be used to guide students’ educational program planning. This course will identify specific health-related accommodations and specify how they promote the students’ access to, and participation in, the general curriculum. This course will provide examples of educational interventions that can be used to retain grade-level content and student performance expectations while reducing the complexity of activities. This course will enable students to engage in dialogue with general education teachers to determine expectations for all students in the class and explore specific needs of students who require modifications in curriculum content or performance expectations. This course will enable students to engage in dialogue with general education teachers to determine expectations for all students in the class and explore specific needs of students who require modifications in curriculum content or performance expectations. Students will discuss the importance of considering long-range goals in conjunction with the development of short-term IEP goals and objectives for students with disabilities.

    Semester 3
    Task and Situation Analysis
    This course will enable students to understand the relationship of curricular scope and sequence to task and situation analysis. Students will learn to use task analysis for formative and summative assessment purposes. Students will learn to use shaping and prompting techniques to promote independent function. Students will learn to create task and situation analyses for a variety of curricular areas.

    Assistive Technology
    This course defines assistive technology (AT) devices and services and describes the legal mandates for AT devices and services. Students will discuss appropriate positioning, seating, and mobility for facilitating physical function and AT use for individuals with physical or multiple disabilities. Students will evaluate AT product features for specific individuals across several areas of function. Students will learn to work as a member of a collaborative team to assess students’ needs for AT and make informed choices about purchasing commercial AT devices. Students will also learn to incorporate a variety of accommodations and modifications into classroom and community learning environments.

    Augmentative and Alternative Communication
    In this course students will be introduced to early communication development and methods to promote its development. This course defines augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Students will learn to differentiate between form, function, and content of communication and give examples of each. This course will describe strategies that promote nonsymbolic receptive and expressive communication. This course will describe different aided and unaided forms of symbolic communication and describe types of selection techniques, symbols, rate enhancement techniques, and ways to display symbols. Students will learn to implement several instructional strategies for promoting AAC use.

    Adaptations for Personal Independence
    This course will enable students to assess and teach hygiene skills, such as hand- washing, face washing, hair brushing, oral hygiene, tissue use, and feminine hygiene. Students will learn how to teach using a target strategy or a quadrant strategy for personal care activities. This course will examine health-care procedures as instructional objectives that students may learn to perform independently or with assistance. Students will discuss the impact of time-limited steps and caution steps on instructional methodology and selection of student objectives. Students will discuss guidelines for promoting successful dressing skills and possible adaptations. This course will describe home care management skills and possible adaptations that may be necessary for students with physical or multiple disabilities.

    Adaptations in Physical Education, Leisure Education, and Recreation
    This course defines adapted physical education, leisure education, and recreation. This course explores legislative mandates relevant to the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in sports, recreation, and leisure activities. Students will learn to collaborate with adapted physical education professionals to deliver appropriate services for individuals with physical or multiple disabilities. This course will identify the more commonly used adapted physical education assessment instruments and the possible means of authentic assessments. This course will enable students to select and develop appropriate leisure education activities for individuals with physical or multiple disabilities.

    Reading Instruction and Adaptations
    In this course students will discuss the impact on reading of various aspects of the Physical and Health Disabilities Performance Model. Students will examine basic adaptations that promote access to written material for students with physical or multiple disabilities. Participants will learn to assist students with physical or multiple disabilities to use a reliable means of response during reading instruction. This course will provide strategies and adaptations to promote emergent literacy. Students will discuss four general approaches to reading: scaffolding instruction, self-regulated instruction, direct instruction, and balanced instruction. Students will also discuss the nonverbal reading approach and demonstrate how it can be used to promote decoding skills with a student with a physical and speech impairment.

    Writing Instruction and Adaptations
    This course will identify the issues that contribute to writing difficulties for students with physical or multiple disabilities. Students will examine instructional strategies and modifications for promoting handwriting skills. This course will describe computer adaptations such as keyboard modifications, keyboard layout modifications, alternative keyboards, alternative input devices, and output modifications. This course will describe considerations in teaching keyboarding skills and computer tools. Students will explore strategies for teaching spelling and spelling tools that may be used to promote correct spelling. Students will discuss written expression considerations and instructional strategies. Students will also learn strategies for promoting functional writing skills.

    Science and Social Studies Instruction and Adaptations
    In this course students will discuss how to prepare a science or social studies lesson using appropriate instructional strategies. This course will explore a range of adaptations that may be needed when teaching science or social studies to students with physical or multiple disabilities. Students will construct a science lesson using the process of scientific injury and collaborative groups. Students will discuss the importance of critical thinking and authentic content for social studies. This course will examine possible adaptations needed to evaluate student learning and present a social studies standard and discuss how to make it applicable for students with severe intellectual disabilities. Students will also discuss ways to connect with the community for science and social studies.

    Mathematics Instruction and Adaptations
    In this course students will examine the national math standards and explore examples of how they may be adapted for students with multiple disabilities who also have severe intellectual disabilities. Students will discuss various types of adaptations that may be used with students who have physical or multiple disabilities for math instruction. This course will describe six general approaches and principles of math instruction to promote effective learning. Students will discuss and establish instructional techniques to teach beginning math skills. This course will describe and demonstrate systematic instructional techniques for computational skills, including math facts, algorithms, sequencing instruction, and adaptations. Students will also discuss instructional strategies for functional math skills and adaptations across money, time, and calendar use.

  • Fees & Expenses


    Tuition fees listed are in effect for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Application Fee: $100.00
    • Textbooks: $975.00
    • Postal Fee: $49.00
    • Tuition Fee: $3,825.00

    Total Tuition & Fees: $4,949.00