Chief and Band Councillor Management

  • Program Title: Chief and Band Councillor Management
    Credential: Diploma
    Delivery: Online
    Program Length: 3 Semesters (1 year)
    Program Availability: Part-time or Full-time
    Offered: This program is available starting every Monday.

    Program Description


    Experienced or newly elected chief and councillors will look at public administration and its current trends in contemporary business issues. The Management component will build upon the multistream understanding that effective management involves balancing a broad set of criteria, ranging from community enhancement and ecological sustainability to meaningful work and financial viability. Throughout this program, captivating experiences and stories from actual managers and leading organizations demonstrate managers making a difference. We have also included number modules that will help with the day-to-day challenges one might face. The program will consist of reading and writing assignments, coupled with online activities including: discussion questions, PowerPoint lectures, and practical case studies.

    Students have fifty-two (52) weeks to complete their program requirements, starting from the date of their first course.

    Learning Outcomes


    The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to:

    1. Evaluate the impact of global issues on an organization’s business opportunities by using an environmental scan.
    2. Apply principles of corporate sustainability, corporate social responsibility and ethics to support an organization’s business initiatives.
    3. Assess and use current concepts/systems and technologies to support an organization’s business initiatives.
    4. Conduct and present research to support business decision making.
    5. Plan, implement and evaluate projects by applying project management principles .
    6. Perform work in compliance with relevant statutes, regulations and business practices.
    7. Apply human resource practices to support management objectives and the organization’s goals.
    8. Use accounting and financial principles to support the management and operations of an organization.
    9. Assess marketing and sales concepts and strategies and apply them to the needs of an organization.
    10. Outline principles of supply chain management and operations management and assess their impact on the operations of an organization.
    11. Participate in the development of a business plan.
    12. Develop strategies for ongoing personal and professional development to enhance work performance in the business field.
    13. Outline strategies used to manage risks in an organization’s business activities.

    Your Career


    The Chief represents all the members of the Band. The Chief will be responsible for regular communications to Band members on important issues.  The Chief will need to be familiar with Band programs and services in order to direct inquiries to appropriate Band staff. As a salaried position, the Chief has high-level administrative responsibilities that are unique as a member of Council. These responsibilities are carried out in full cooperation with staff through the CEO. Specific duties will be change throughout the fiscal year depending on the organization’s needs. Responsibilities will include aspects of communications, government relations, finance, human resources, program delivery and evaluation. The Band Council sets policy and strategic direction, and is also directly involved in major decisions that significantly affect the direction of the Band’s programs and services, financial well-being and good standing.

  • Admission Requirements


    College Eligibility

    • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent; OR
    • Academic and Career Entrance (ACE) Certificate; OR
    • General Educational Development (GED); OR
    • Mature Student status (19 years of age or older and without a high school diploma at the start of the program).

  • Courses


    Semester 1
    Basic Study Skills
    Office Technology
    Interpersonal Communication
    Accounting Concepts and Procedures
    Financial Accounting I
    Financial Accounting II
    Management Basics
    Meeting and Conference Management

    Semester 2
    Communications in First Nations Governments
    Business Planning
    Organizational Behaviour
    Lands, Resources and Economic Development
    Human Resource Management in First Nations Organizations
    Advertising and Marketing Communications
    Project Management and Organizational Effectiveness

    Semester 3
    Financial Management in First Nations Governments
    Social and Community Development
    Employment and Professional Relationships
    Strategic Planning and Implementation
    Leadership in Aboriginal Communities and Government
    Intergovernmental Relations

    Every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy of information provided on our website. The College reserves the right to modify any course, program, curriculum, fee, timetable, or campus location at any time.

    Register for this course.

  • Course Descriptions


    Semester 1
    Basic Study Skills
    This course will enable students to assess their current study skills and plan for improvement. Students will practice time-management techniques for successful studying. Students will learn to develop powerful reading skills and practice memory techniques to enhance ability to learn and improve test performance. This course will also help students to develop specific study skills for mathematics and related subjects and implement an action plan to improve them.

    Office Technology
    This course defines telecommunications and provides an overview of technology—computer hardware and software, telecommunications networks, troubleshooting, security, and ethics. The software section of this course will help students understand the difference between operating systems software and applications software, help students troubleshoot software problems, help students learn how to avoid computer viruses and help students determine how to make ethical choices related to the use of materials covered by the Canadian Copyright Act.

    Interpersonal Communication
    This course explores human communication. The focus is for students to become aware of their present ways of communicating and to build on the communication skills they have already established. The goal is to enable students to become more successful in communicating with others by examining the cognitive activities that shape communication, exploring the elements and process of communication, becoming aware of the dynamics of relational communication and practicing the skills of effective communication.

    Accounting Concepts and Procedures
    The course begins with an introduction to accounting and the organizational forms of business: sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, and limited liability corporations. Topics include: assets, liabilities, and equities defined and explained through examples and the accounting equation. Students will learn the steps necessary to prepare a balance sheet. This course discusses the income statement, the statement of owner’s equity, and the balance sheet.

    Financial Accounting I
    This is part one of a two-part introductory financial accounting course. Topics covered include credits and debits, analyzing and recording business transactions, banking procedures and control of cash, calculating pay and recording payroll taxes, purchases and cash payments, and preparing and completing a worksheet for a merchandise company.

    Financial Accounting II
    This is part two of the introductory financial accounting course. Topics covered include accounting for bad debts, accounting for property, plant, equipment, and intangible assets, corporations and bonds payable, analyzing financial statements, departmental accounting and manufacturing accounting.

    Management Basics
    In this course students will learn the four primary functions of management and the roles that correspond to each function. This course also introduces students to the two contrasting viewpoints on defining “effective” management: Mainstream and Multistream. The role of the manager and the skills and techniques required to achieve organizational outcomes through the management of people, money and time are also examined. This course also provides students with the managerial concepts and ownership principles required for a successful career in the management or ownership of a small- to medium-sized enterprise.

    Meeting and Conference Management
    This program offers a solid foundation for event planning and meeting management. The importance of developing a strategic plan and the necessary logistics for event execution. Understanding how to set meeting goals and objectives, adhere to project budget, choose the best facility, manage the logistics and build the program content is critical to event planning / meeting management

    Semester 2
    Communications in First Nations Governments
    Provides practice to improve academic and workplace writing for documents such as correspondence, reports, proposals, briefing notes, policy papers, newsletters and internet publications. Written assignments improve the students’ ability to communicate clearly, organize and edit material and present arguments with a focus on good grammar, prose style and plain language. Students analyze, interpret and summarize complex written material. Topics include internal and external strategic communication, speaking skills, and oral traditions and cultural practices.

    Business Planning
    This course outlines the four steps of the planning process: setting a mission/vision, setting strategic goals/plans, setting operational goals/plans, and implementation.

    Organizational Management
    This course discusses organizational design and explains why some organizations organize the work that is to be done. Just like people, different organizations organize their activities in very different ways to accomplish their goals. Managers must carefully engage in organization design to ensure that they create an organizational type that fits the structure and the environment, strategy, and technology of the organization. Students will learn the process of organization design, including organization structure and organizational type. Topics also include: human resources management and organizational change.

    Lands, Resources and Economic Development
    Explores the principles related to traditional governance of lands and resources; community needs and interests; and forecasting future needs/challenges. Topics include jurisdictions and rights on and off reserve and legislative, policy, and negotiation options. Resource issues such as economic development, land use planning and environmental and ecosystem health are reviewed. Consultation and accommodation requirements for negotiating comprehensive claims and self-government agreements are studied to demonstrate how to build effective partnerships. Includes conflict resolution methods.

    Human Resource Management in First Nations Organizations
    Learning based on contemporary human resource management theory and practice and traditional Aboriginal practice and values. Topics include: developing a human resources plan and robust human resources policies and practices; managing people and tasks; interpersonal workplace communications and relations; selection; retention; and development of employees. Improving workplaces will be examined through team building, motivating self and others, providing feedback, conflict management and dispute resolution, workplace safety, well-being, and self awareness and self care.

    Advertising and Marketing Communications
    This course addresses the theoretical and practical aspects of modern marketing communications. Graduates will be able to perform advertising/communications functions using a variety of media techniques. Topics covered include marketing and sales, marketing with social media, basic internet marketing, marketing for small businesses, basic internet marketing, marketing with social media, telemarketing: using the telephone as a sales tool, project management and public speaking.

    Project Management and Organizational Effectiveness
    Students produce a final capstone community/workplace project. Project includes: development of detailed project proposal/business plan taking into account: participation and resource requirements; linkages between power, authority, roles and responsibilities; tasks, critical path; milestones; managing performance and costs; monitoring and control; managing information; communications and consultation requirements; accountability and reporting and review mechanisms.

    Semester 3
    Financial Management in First Nations Governments
    Provides financial management frameworks, policies and procedures. Reviews the roles and responsibilities of administrators and ethics of money management. Through the development and management of revenue streams, learners will effectively manage income and expenditures through skills in: budgeting, record keeping, preparing financial statements and reports following accounting standards and practices. Topics include cost management and control, capital costs and infrastructure investment, meeting accountability requirements, forecasting costs, planning new projects, and using contractors and consultants.

    Social and Community Development
    Examines how social and cultural factors influence community development and well-being. Analyzes and assesses needs for social and community activities and services, now and in the future. Identifies resourcing and jurisdictional issues in the development and implementation of community initiatives. Identifies community characteristics and their potential role/impact on proposed initiatives. Addresses issues of sustainability and development of effective partnerships and leading change agendas. Prepares students for their capstone project.

    Employment and Professional Relationships
    Students will be introduced to the basic elements of the employment relationship and learn the ways in which the law affects recruitment practices. Students will examine the content of a typical employment contract and discuss the legal issues relating to the terms and conditions of employment. This course examines how the employment relationship ends and the differences among dismissals for just cause, dismissals with notice, constructive dismissals, and wrongful dismissals. Students will examine the issues that arise from a wrongful dismissal suit the components of a termination settlement. This course will also examine how business uses the services of professionals, the legal responsibilities of professionals to their clients and others who rely on their work and the role of professional bodies.

    Strategic Planning and Implementation
    Examines elements of strategic planning and how to implement plans through policy and practice. Topics include: strategic vision; mission statements; conducting environmental scans, needs analyses, and forecasts; planning; setting goals; and policy development. Review of program implementation: authorities; mandates; frameworks for decision-making; and portfolio management. Demonstrates horizontal and vertical integration of policies and programs between different portfolios. Implementation topics include: change management; monitoring; evaluation; reporting; information management protocols and rules.

    Leadership in Aboriginal Communities and Government
    Develops capacities to understand, appreciate, and develop students’ own leadership and that of others. Drawing on both Western theory and practice and First Nations values and leadership practices, students will develop an understanding of different leadership styles, team dynamics, motivation and management of people and projects within diverse communities facing both internal and external challenges. Povides experiential learning, development of self-knowledge, and acquisition of practical leadership skills and strategies for the workplace.

    Intergovernmental Relations
    Topics include how and why it is necessary to develop and maintain successful relationships with communities; organizations; and other governments, including other First Nations, municipal, provincial/territorial, or federal. Administrators learn how authorities, rights, laws/regulations, and interests shape outcomes, whether negotiating treaties, exercising rights in areas with overlapping jurisdictions, or developing partnerships for economic development or service delivery. Examines Aboriginal and treaty rights, application of the Indian Act, treaty negotiations, alternative partnerships, lands and resources issues.

    Register for this course.


  • Fees & Expenses


    Tuition fees listed are in effect for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Application Fee: $100.00
    • Textbooks: $975.00
    • Postal Fee: $49.00
    • Tuition Fee: $3,825.00

    Total Tuition & Fees: $4,949.00