Adult Educator

  • Program Title: Adult Educator
    Credential: Diploma
    Delivery: Online
    Program Length: 3 Semesters (One year)
    Program Availability: Full time or Part time
    Offered: This program is available starting every Monday.

    Program Description


    This program focuses on the principals of teaching and learning in adult training and education. Designed by professional educators, this program aims to provide trainers and adult educators with an opportunity to enhance their abilities to deliver education and training services consistent with the demands of adult student learners. Participants will acquire an enhanced understanding of self, theoretical and practical skills necessary to effectively teach adults, current curriculum development and evaluation techniques, knowledge of the private & public college systems, organizational structure, and a basic set of research skills..

    Students have fifty-two (52) weeks to complete their program requirements, starting from the date of their first course.

    Learning Outcomes


    1. Provide educational support in compliance with pertinent education-related legislation, standards, regulations and policies, health and safety legislation and regulations, as well as organizational policies, practices and procedures.
    2. Develop and implement strategies to promote and support positive school climates that contribute to a safe, caring and secure educational setting.
    3. Collaborate with members of the Individual Education Plan (IEP) team by assisting in the development and revision of the IEPs of adult learners.
    4. Implement components of educational support programs of instruction under the direction and support of the IEP team and/or relevant members of the school community.
    5. Lead by example to promote empathetic, positive and pro-social behaviour in all learners to facilitate the development of social competence in adult learners in accordance with their IEPs.
    6. Promote the development of independence in, and provide assistance to, adult learners in their performance of routine activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) in accordance with their IEPs.
    7. Monitor, document and report on the behaviour, performance and progress of adult in accordance with their IEPs.
    8. Prepare and present a plan for engaging in ongoing personal and professional development to promote competence in the educational support field.

    Your Career


    As an adult educator or career development professional, providing information, advice and guidance to help individuals navigate transitions in education, work and life-balance is vibrant and rewarding work. The specialization in Adult Education is intended for individuals working in career development with career, employment, or immigration agencies, as well as advisors in academic secondary or post-secondary institutions. In this program, students gain the foundations, communication and assessment skills needed to facilitate, motivate and work successfully with a diverse population.

  • Admission Requirements


    College Eligibility

    • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent; OR
    • Academic and Career Entrance (ACE) Certificate; OR
    • General Educational Development (GED); OR
    • Mature Student status (19 years of age or older and without a high school diploma at the start of the program).

    Call the Admissions Office at 1 (800) 267-2577 for more details. Academic prerequisites for this program may be obtained free of charge through Academic Upgrading.

    Application Process
    Program intake – Apply to this program by visiting our Registration page. If you are entering into this program as a mature student please attach your resume when submitting your registration information online.

  • Courses


    Semester 1
    Your first semester will be conducted fully online with the Canadian College of Educators. You will have been sent log in information from this Career College to complete this work.

    Compulsory courses:

    AE 101 Foundations of Adult Education
    AE 102 Designing Instruction for Adult Education
    AE 103 Assessment and Evaluation
    AE 104 Facilitating Adult Learning

    Elective Courses:

    AE 105 Teaching and Developing an Online Course
    AE 106 College and University Teaching in Canada
    AE 107 Teaching English as Another Language
    AE 108 Practicum in Adult Education
    AE 109 Job Search Skills for Success
    AE 110 Teaching in Career Colleges and Vocational Institutes
    AE 111 – Training and Development

    Semester 2
    Behavioural Views of Learning
    Cognitive Views of Learning
    Motivation in Learning and Teaching
    Creating Learning Environments
    Classroom Assessment, Grading, and Testing
    Instructional Methods

    Semester 3
    Understanding Individuals with Physical, Health, and Multiple Disabilities
    Curriculum and Individualized Educational Planning
    Providing Culturally Competent Career Development Interventions
    Communication and Interpersonal Skills
    Introduction to Learning and Technology
    Research Skills Development

    Every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy of information provided on our website. The College reserves the right to modify any course, program, curriculum, fee, timetable, or campus location at any time.

  • Course Descriptions


    Semester 1

    Compulsory courses:

    AE 101 Foundations of Adult Education

    This course introduces the subject of Adult Education. It describes theories and practices in adult education including adult education in Canada, academic writing, learning styles, philosophy of adult education and the differences between adults and children as learners. It is designed for those who plan, administer, and deliver training and education to adults.  No prerequisite is required for this course.

    AE 102 Designing Instruction for Adult Education

    This course introduces various instructional theories, practices and strategies of Adult Education. It further focuses on the decision making instructional strategies and includes a step-by-step design of an instructional unit using various instructional methodologies. It includes sessions on purposes of education and training, learning outcomes and objectives, selecting and sequencing material and instructional strategies. Prerequisite AE101.

    AE 103 Assessment and Evaluation

    This course introduces assessment and evaluation strategies based on the theories and practices of adult teaching and learning. It includes units on purposes, tools, administering and developing assessment, and evaluation of adult students. It further provides teachers with a possibility to self-reflect on their own teaching. Prerequisites: AE101 & AE102.

    AE 104 Facilitating Adult Learning

    This course brings the theories to practice; it describes community and institutional based education and their relationship to Adult Education. The participants will further learn about presentation and decision-making skills while facilitating groups and teams. Prerequisites: AE101, AE102, AE103.

    After completing the Compulsory courses, you will complete two of the Elective courses. See the description /overview of the courses to choose from below.

    Elective Courses:

    AE 105 Teaching and Developing an Online Course

    This course is designed for those who would like to learn how to create and maintain a successful online course. This asynchronous course includes features of an effective online course design. It includes chapters on hurdles in online teaching/learning, CMS, forms of assessment, uploading files uploads, graphic organization and basic terminology used in an online design. All compulsory courses must be finished before this course if taken as a part of the Adult Education Certificate.

    AE 106 College and University Teaching in Canada

    This course is designed for those who are considering teaching or working in a College or University setting. It includes a comprehensive overview of all of Canada’s Universities and Colleges, explores National Occupation Codes relevant to the field, job descriptions and opportunities in post-secondary education and takes a closer look at Canada’s Universities, Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology and Private Career Colleges. All compulsory courses must be finished before this course if taken as a part of the Adult Education Certificate.

    AE 107 Teaching English as Another Language

    This course is designed for those who may work in a multi-cultural learning environment with ESL learners or who are considering teaching English as a Second Language as an additional qualification. It includes lessons on Becoming an ESL teacher, Multiple Intelligences in ESL Classroom, Teaching the Four Language Skills, ESL Teaching Approaches and Teaching Resources. All compulsory courses must be finished before this course if taken as a part of the Adult Education Certificate.

    AE 108 Practicum in Adult Education

    This is a highly practical course. Participants will be required to listen, view, evaluate and assess learner’s skills, learning and knowledge based on the Adult Education Principles discussed in the compulsory courses. Participants will be also required to teach 10 hours. All compulsory courses must be finished before this course if taken as a part of the Adult Education Certificate.

    AE 109 Job Search Skills for Success

    This course is designed for those who would like to expand on their job search skills. It helps adult educators to assess their skills and plan for the necessary steps that will enable them to obtain their dream job. It includes sessions on various topics related to the Interview, Resume Writing, and building the Professional Career Portfolio.  All compulsory courses must be finished before this course if taken as a part of the Adult Education Certificate.

    AE 110 Teaching in Career Colleges and Vocational Institutes

    This course is designed for instructors in Canadian Career Colleges and Vocational Institutes seeking professional development, training, and an additional qualification specifically in the vocational post-secondary education sector. It is also suitable for field experts in any field who are or may plan, administer, and deliver instruction to adults in a vocational training adult learning environment in Canada.

    AE 111 – Training and Development

    This course is designed to for those who may be interested or involved in teaching employee’s basic skills to perform their jobs or professionally developing additional skills for staff. It includes the step by step process in designing an effective organizational training and development plan that includes orienting employees, analyzing training needs, instructional design, the training process, implementing training and development, and evaluating the training effort. All compulsory courses must be finished before this course if taken as a part of the Adult Education Certificate.

    Semester 2
    Behavioural Views of Learning
    This course defines learning, and distinguish among the processes involved in learning though contiguity, classical conditioning, and operant conditioning. This course will enable students to distinguish between positive and negative reinforcement, and presentation and removal punishment. Students will learn apply behavioural approaches to modifying behaviour in and out of the classroom. Students will discuss newer approaches to applied behavioural analysis, including functional behavioural assessment and self-management. Students will also discuss contemporary challenges to behavioural theories of learning, and address concerns about their application.

    Cognitive Views of Learning
    This course will enable students to differentiate between behavioural and cognitive views of learning. Students will examine early information processing models of memory and recent cognitive science models, including working memory and cognitive load theory. In this course students will discuss the role of different kinds of knowledge in learning and remembering. This course will describe the processes involved in storing and retrieving different types of information from long-term memory. Students will learn to identify some developmental and individual differences in memory and describe processes and strategies involved in becoming knowledgeable.

    Motivation in Learning and Teaching
    This course defines motivation, and differentiates among five theoretical explanations for learner motivation. Students will discuss how learners’ needs influence their motivation to learn and examine the different kinds of goal orientations and their influences on motivation. This course defines how students’ beliefs and attributions can influence motivation and describes the roles of interests, curiosity, emotions, and anxiety in motivation. This course will also examine how teachers can influence and encourage students’ motivation to learn.

    Creating Learning Environments
    This course will relate academic learning time and student cooperation to creating and maintaining a classroom climate conducive to academic achievement and socio-emotional well-being. Students will explore the research on the roles of rules, procedures, and consequences in classroom management. Students will discuss how the physical environment can support or interfere with learning, and plan an appropriate arrangement of your classroom. This course will identify strategies for preventing and addressing student misbehaviors, including bullying and characterize successful teacher-student communication.

    Classroom Assessment, Grading, and Testing
    This course will enable students to distinguish among evaluation, measurement, and assessment, and describe the functions of each. Students will examine norm-referenced and criterion-referenced assessments and discuss how reliability, validity, and absence of bias are used to understand and judge assessments. This course will describe two kinds of traditional classroom testing, and how authentic assessment can be used as an alternative to traditional assessments. Students will examine the effects of grading on students and the types of strategies teachers can use to communicate to parents about grades. Students will discuss how to interpret common standardized test scores (percentile rank, z scores). This course will also identify some of the current issues in standardized testing.

    Instructional Methods
    This course discusses different types of methods for learning. The courses present widely used instructional methods, gives examples, and list advantages and limitations of each method. The aim of the course is to help prospective or practicing teachers to select the appropriate method(s) for their students. Students will discuss techniques for selecting and combining methods for instructional purposes.

    Semester 3
    Understanding Individuals with Physical, Health, and Multiple Disabilities
    In this course students will explore critical issues in the lives of individuals with physical, health, or multiple disabilities. Students will evaluate educational service delivery systems and the challenges of effective educational inclusion for students with physical or multiple disabilities. This course will identify teacher competencies specific to serving students with physical, health, or multiple disabilities and apply them to the evolving roles of special education teachers. This course will enable students to understand past and present perspectives on individuals with physical, health, or multiple disabilities. Students will compare traditional and evolving definitions, classifications, and models of disability. Students will learn to use disability classifications and labels that are objective, appropriate, and dignified.

    Curriculum and Individualized Educational Planning
    This course will describe discerning features of the curricular options that can be used to guide students’ educational program planning. This course will identify specific health-related accommodations and specify how they promote the students’ access to, and participation in, the general curriculum. This course will provide examples of educational interventions that can be used to retain grade-level content and student performance expectations while reducing the complexity of activities. This course will enable students to engage in dialogue with general education teachers to determine expectations for all students in the class and explore specific needs of students who require modifications in curriculum content or performance expectations.

    Providing Culturally Competent Career Development Interventions
    This course provides an overview of important issues to consider in providing culturally sensitive career development interventions.  It reviews topics such as ethnocentrism, acculturation, individualism, collectivism, and identity development models; it also discusses issues pertaining to culturally sensitive assessment strategies.

    Communication and Interpersonal Skills
    Students will develop communication skills needed in a culturally diverse workforce. This course will explain the communication process and its elements and describe types of listening and ways to improve listening skills. Students will examine factors related to effective verbal communication and learn use effective verbal and nonverbal communication skills.

    Introduction to Learning and Technology
    This course will describe and give examples of learning and what constitutes an enhanced learning experience. Students will evaluate given learning scenarios and determine how, when, and why each learning experience could be enhanced. The course will describe examples of technology and educational technology. The course will describe how technology can potentially impact learning in a meaningful manner and generate examples of how this could occur. Students will discuss the evolution of the fields of instructional design, educational media, and educational computing, and describe the contributions of prominent individuals or projects to the development of those fields.

    Research Skills Development
    This course introduces students to several different tools so that they can become a stronger researcher and can create proposals, reports, or simply find good information and review it. Students will start by learning basic research skills techniques like reading, memory recall, note-taking, and planning. Participants also learn about different kinds of outlines, and how to move to writing, editing, and polishing the final work while sharing how to use different sources such as libraries, journals, and the Internet.

  • Fees & Expenses


    Tuition fees listed are in effect for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Application Fee: $100.00
    • Textbooks: $975.00
    • Postal Fee: $49.00
    • Tuition Fee: $3,825.00

    Total Tuition & Fees: $4,949.00